Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
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SEGENHOE HISTORY

Thomas Potter Macqueen brought the Segenhoe name from Bedfordshire to the Hunter Valley in 1824. He was born at Segenhoe Manor, and as a British Member of Parliament he was entitled to apply for a land grant in the colony of New South Wales. Moreover, he wanted to transport as many people as possible from his estates to the new colony to alleviate high unemployment in England. Macqueen eventually acquired 8,100 hectares and labelled the area as the Segenhoe Valley. He then hired a manager, purchased a ship, gathered together people, livestock, building materials and supplies and sent them off to Australia.

Within five years Segenhoe was up and running and the property boasted a community post office, hospital, police station, jail, homestead, church and schoolhouse. It also housed one of the largest contingents of convicts in New South Wales. However, Potter Macqueen got into financial difficulty and the property languished for many years before it was finally subdivided and sold off. The homestead and outbuildings became part of a 1,010 hectare holding, and retained the Segenhoe name. William Brown established thoroughbred stud operations at Segenhoe in 1913, but it was the racing personality Alan Cooper who really put Segenhoe on the map when he took over in 1931. He paid a record price for a 3YO Victoria Derby winner and was determined to establish a quality horse farm.

When he sold the property in 1938 to Lionel Israel, the ragged history of the farm disappeared, and from then on Segenhoe would forever be recognised as a quality horse and cattle stud. Lionel ran the farm solidly for 48 years.

The property, resident stallions, broodmares and their progeny were all sold in 1986 to Sydney property developers Tony Bott and George Parlby. Four years later, the ownership changed again, and a varied group of people took up percentage holdings in the Segenhoe property including Michael Sissian, who ended up owning the property outright before he in turn sold it to an American, George Hofmeister. Sissian then purchased the current Segenhoe farm (taking the Segenhoe name with him), and continued operating independently under the famous Segenhoe label.

In 2010 Kevin Maloney and the Maloney family bought the Segenhoe Stud and transformed the farm by doubling it in size and investing millions of dollars to make it the world-class stud it is today.
© Segenhoe


Thomas Potter MacQueen

Thomas Potter Macqueen brought the Segenhoe name from Bedfordshire to the Hunter Valley in 1824. He was born at Segenhoe Manor, and as a British Member of Parliament he was entitled to apply for a land grant in the colony of New South Wales. Moreover, he wanted to transport as many people as possible from his estates to the new colony to alleviate high unemployment in England. Macqueen eventually acquired 8,100 hectares and labelled the area as the Segenhoe Valley. He then hired a manager, purchased a ship, gathered together people, livestock, building materials and supplies and sent them off to Australia.


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