Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
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First Name: 
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James Milson

James Milson

Male Abt 1785 - 1872  (~ 87 years)

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  • Name James Milson 
    Born Abt 1785  Woolsthorpe Near Grantham, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 25 Oct 1872  St Thomas, North Sydney, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I382  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 23 Jun 2018 

    Family Elizabeth Kilpack,   b. 16 Jun 1793,   d. 17 Oct 1850, Careening Cove, East St Leonards, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years) 
    Married 5 Jan 1810  St Phillips Church, Parramatta, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Sophia Milson,   b. 1811, Field of Mars, Parramatta, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jan 1903, St Leonards, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)
    +2. James Joseph Milson,   b. 25 Nov 1814, Field of Mars, Parramatta, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jan 1903, St Leonards, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
    +3. David Ambrose Milson,   b. 1817, Castle Hill, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Oct 1890, Wollomba, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     4. Elizabeth Hale Milson,   b. 1820, Pennant Hills, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 May 1872, St Leonards, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
    +5. John Brisbane Milson,   b. 1822, Pennant Hills, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Feb 1891, Milson's Point, Sydney, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     6. Robert Milson,   b. 1824, Pennant Hills, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Sep 1886, Milson's Island, Hawkesbury, NSW Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
    Last Modified 19 Jun 2018 
    Family ID F157  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    James Milson
    James Milson
    Loreto Convent
    Loreto Convent

    Histories
    James Milson
    James Milson
    James arrived on "ALBION" as a Seaman on 18th August 1806, and quickly set about establishing himself as a farmer and acquiring land.

    James worked in a quarry for stone for ships' ballast in Careening Cove which was situated between Kirribilli and Kurraba Point, beside Neutral Bay. He established a slaughterhouse to provide the town across the harbour with fresh lamb and mutton.


  • Notes 
    • James worked in a quarry for stone for ships' ballast in Careening Cove which was situated between Kirribilli and Kurraba Point, beside Neutral Bay. He established a slaughterhouse to provide the town across the harbour with fresh lamb and mutton.

      He had his share if problems when he first settled in the area. In May 1814 the ship "Three Bees" caught fire at Government Wharf, Sydney Cove. She was loaded with thirty casks of gunpowder and her cannon was "all shotted". The ship was cut loose and her first gun went off at 6.30pm.and a ball landed near the guardhouse, another went through Captain Piper's parlour window. Altogether fourteen guns went off before she blew up. Some of the cannon balls were said to have crashed into Milson's boatshed on the North Shore.

      In 1825 he was granted 50 acres between Lavender Bay and Careening Cove.

      In 1826 bushfires ravaged the North Shore destroying his home and possessions, which included the title deeds and notes for his land grants. It also destroyed his fruit and vegetable crops.

      Between 1832 and his death in 1872, a number of substantial houses were built on his land for his family. Whilst most of these building have since been demolished or greatly modified, some remain and are important features of North Sydney’s cultural heritage.“Carabella Cottage” was built in 1828 for his daughter and her husband, William Shairp, at the head of Careening Cove.

      “Brisbane House” was built in 1831 for his second daughter Elizabeth, wife of R.T. Hall. “Wia Wia” was completed in 1834 for his son James. “Grantham” was built on the high ground as a residence for himself. Other houses associated with the family include “Elamang”, “Fern Lodge”, “Careena”, “The Hermitage” and a number of others in the vicinity.

      Loreto was established in 1908. Loreto has changed significantly from the time it was first opened in 1907 until now in 2004.

      The first building that was occupied and bought by the Loreto nuns was Elemang, which was built around 1850 by James Milson as a wedding present for his son. The Loreto Nuns bought elemang in 1907 and it was officially opened as a school in 1908. ... Over 40 years later in 1979 the Elemang was reconstructed and refurbished so that elemang could be changed into senior school staff rooms and in 1981 the construction was complete.

      In 1922 The Alfred Milson’s House ‘coreena’ was bought and acquired for junior school and a residence for the new Loreto Boarders. ... In 1959 The Coreena was demolished and replaced as a junior school. ... The Junior School art rooms, principal and secretaries offices where extended and re-furbished, and the boys toilets where demolished in 1991. In 1997 computers had been placed in the junior school library and in 1999 the kitchen facilities where upgraded.
    • By 1840 the population of the Lower North Shore had increased to a level where serious thought could be given to the establishment of schools and churches in the area. To translate these thoughts into realities a meeting was convened in early 1843 by James Milson of Careening Cove, Alexander Berry and his brother-in-law Edward Wollstonecraft, merchants of North Sydney, William Miller, Assistant Commissary General, Thomas Walker, and the celebrated artist Conrad Martens. All six men were to leave their names on the Lower North Shore.

      By 1840 the population of the Lower North Shore had increased to a level where serious thought could be given to the establishment of schools and churches in the area. To translate these thoughts into realities a meeting was convened in early 1843 by James Milson of Careening Cove, Alexander Berry and his brother-in-law Edward Wollstonecraft, merchants of North Sydney, William Miller, Assistant Commissary General, Thomas Walker, and the celebrated artist Conrad Martens. All six men were to leave their names on the Lower North Shore.

    • James MILSON and Elizabeth KILPACK

      MILSON, JAMES (1783-1872), farmer, was born on 25 November 1783 at Grantham, Lincolnshire, England. He arrived in Sydney in the Albion in August 1806 and obtained employment on a farm at the Field of Mars (near Ryde). On 8 January 1810 at St Philip's Church, Sydney, he married Elizabeth Kilpack (1793-1850), his employer's daughter; he then described himself as 'servant and labourer'. By June 1820 he was living on a grant of 100 acres (40 ha) at Pennant Hills, where he ran 40 cattle. He had too little pasture for them and asked for more land. His request was supported by Robert Campbell who had been a fellow passenger in the Albion. In 1824 he was authorized to select 300 acres (121 ha) near Pennant Hills but when he was informed that this land had been granted to another he sought 50 acres (20 ha) at North Shore and 300 (121 ha) farther inland. By 1825 he was farming on the North Shore of Sydney Harbour; his house there was burnt down in a bush fire in November 1826 and the title deeds of his land at Castle Hill and Hunter's Hill were destroyed.

      In the 1828 census he was recorded as a landholder, of Hunter's Hill, occupying 1600 acres (648 ha), with 220 cattle; in his will, signed in July 1829, he listed 220 acres (89 ha) purchased at Castle Hill, 640 acres (259 ha) at Wallumbie (Wollombi), 50 acres (20 ha) granted by Governor Brisbane at North Shore, and 5 acres (2 ha) on Neutral Harbour (Bay). In 1823-24 Milson was employed as 'keeper' of Government House. In 1832 he built on the North Shore a reservoir for watering ships. In later years he acquired more land and was a keen yachtsman. He died in Sydney on 25 October 1872, survived by four sons and one of his two daughters.

      His eldest son James Milson (1814-1903), was born on 25 November 1814 at the Field of Mars in Sydney and educated at Dr O'Halloran's school, which he left at 16 to serve his mercantile apprenticeship with the Sydney agency of the Liverpool firm of Aspinall, Brown & Co. On his majority, he became a partner in the firm of Robert Campbell junior, his capital being provided by his father. Milson soon gained a wide knowledge of shipowning, importing and wool-buying, and won repute as one of Sydney's most progressive businessmen. The economic crisis in 1841-45 embarrassed the firm of Robert Campbell junior, its credit being over-extended and its bad debts numerous. It was wound up, and in 1846 Milson went into business on his own account. He built up a thriving mercantile concern in Sydney and in the 1850s embarked on pastoral ventures, especially in New England, where he bought Sugarloaf station in 1854. He began to interest himself in steam ferry services in Port Jackson and in September 1863 was one of the founders of the Milson's Point Ferry Co. which operated until March 1878, when it was sold and became the North Shore Ferry Co. In the 1860s Milson became a director of the Bank of New South Wales, the Colonial Sugar Refining Co., the Australian Gaslight Co., the Sydney Exchange and Assurance Co., and the Australian Steam Navigation Co. In 1868 he was deputy-mayor of East St Leonards and was the owner of Elamong and Cremorne estates. He acted as executor for his friend, W. C. Wentworth, and was associated with several other conservative politicians. In the 1870s, with other members of the Milson family, he took up pastoral holdings in central Queensland in conjunction with Oscar de Satgé, as well as on the Diamantina and Gregory Rivers.

      Keenly interested in charities of various kinds, Milson was a director of the Sydney Sailors' Home and of the Benevolent Asylum. In 1881 he founded the Oberlin Friendly Aid Society 'to give friendly aid to cultured persons now indigent'. Like his father he was an enthusiastic yachtsman from the 1830s onwards and in 1862 was first vice-commodore of the Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron and commodore in 1863.

      His 25-ton yacht Era was one of the best-known craft in Sydney in the 1860s. He was one of the first to see the possibilities of the Blue Mountains as a popular health resort. In his old age he opposed Federation.

      Milson married twice: on 22 July 1852 to Marianne Grimes who died 5 November 1864, and on 24 November 1869 to Ann Stewart who died on 10 December 1888. He died on 13 January 1903, leaving three sons and three of his four daughters.
      Select Bibliography

      Historical Records of Australia, series 1, vol 16; R. H. Goddard, The Life and Times of James Milson (Melb, 1955); manuscript catalogue under J. Milson (State Library of New South Wales). More on the resources

      Author: David S. Macmillan

      Print Publication Details: David S. Macmillan, 'Milson, James (1814 - 1903)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 2, Melbourne University Press, 1967, pp 232-233
    • Milsons Point Brief History

      Milsons Point is located near the northern end of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in Sydney's North Shore.Two Aboriginal groups, the Wallumedegal and the Cammeraygal inhabited the North Shore before the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788. The Wallumedegals lived near Milsons Point where they hunted, fished and canoed around the harbour. Most of the Qallumedegals died during a smallpox epidemic in 1789.

      In 1806 James Milson was granted land in the area shortly after arriving to the colony from England. Milson built a cottage which he named the Milk House and set up a dairy cattle farm. He made his living by supplying the ships anchored in the harbour with milk and beef.

      Access from the city to Milsons Point was first provided by watermen, paddle steamers and ferries and later in 1886 the first cable tramway was opened from Milsons Point to St Leonards Park in North Sydney. The first ferry service from the city to Milsons Point was run by harbour waterman, Billy Blue from 1817-1834. Billy Blue was a convict that was sent to the Colonies after stealing sugar.

      Named after James Milson who acquired nine hectares of land near there in 1806. Apart from growing produce and quarring sandstone, he also ran a ferry service between Milsons Point and Bennelong Point. The Harbour Bridge was also fabricated in workshops near this site. He was keeper of Government House
      In 1805, Robert Campbell purchased a large section of land on the waterfront of the North Shore, between Lavender Bay and Careening Bay, extending about 600 yards inland, which comprised Milsons Point and the future sites of Luna Park, North Sydney Olympic Pool, North Shore Railway Line and public recreational areas. ‘It was a block of 120 acres which had been originally granted to Robert Ryan, and had passed via Charles Grimes, the surveyor-general, to its new owner’. James Milson settled on this land in 1806 ‘where by the grace of Robert Campbell, he grazed his herd and built his house’. From 1822 onwards, Milson signed a lease for this land, paying 8 pounds per year but later disputed Campbell’s claim to it.

      In 1825 he was granted 50 acres between Lavender Bay and Careening Cove. Between 1832 and his death in 1872, a number of substantial houses were built on his land for his family. Whilst most of these building have since been demolished or greatly modified, some remain and are important features of North Sydney’s cultural heritage. “Carabella Cottage” was built in 1828 for his daughter and her husband, William Shairp, at the head of Careening Cove. “Brisbane House” was built in 1831 for his second daughter Elizabeth, wife of R.T. Hall. “Wia Wia” was completed in 1834 for his son James. “Grantham” was built on the high ground as a residence for himself. Other houses associated with the family include “Elamang”, “Fern Lodge”, “Careena”, “The Hermitage” and a number of others in the vicinity.

      By 1830, virtually all of the lands comprising the present Council area of North Sydney were held in six properties, with only the central North Sydney township and the point north of Careening Cove remaining as Crown land and some smaller properties in the Crows Nest area. Each property had a residence and some land cleared which grew vegetables and fruit and Milson occasionally ran cattle on the land, but generally the land was too poor for agriculture