Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
Discovering our American, Australian, British, Canadian and European Ancestors
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1 A convict sentence was considered to annul a prior marriage if it existed. Thus David’s previous marriage in Ireland was no impediment to this marriage.

The First Byrnes family
David Burns and Ann Reffin's first son, James Byrnes was born in 1806- possibly on 19th May. David appears to have been appointed a Petty Constable for the town of Parramatta in 1806. Colonel Patterson who had been appointed as Governor after Governor Bligh was overthrown in the Rum Rebellion of 1808 granted him a conditional pardon in 1809. This pardon was revoked when Governor Macquarie was appointed in 1810. On February 4, 1810 their second child Ann Byrns was born. On 11 March Ann Reffin's seven year sentence was completed and she was issued with a Certificate of Pardon on 1 June 1810.

During 1810 David was reappointed as a Petty Constable for Parramatta. Constables were chosen to help keep order in the populace. As you can imagine the population was largely made up of convicted criminals, and petty theft and more violent crimes were common. The Constables were expected to help to keep public order and in return were given some privileges such as annual provision of clothes, food rations and early emancipation from their convict sentences. During that year David also petitioned Governor Macquarie to reissue him with a pardon. This was not granted and David made another petition in 1812. This time he was successful. On 31 January 1813 David Burns was again granted a Conditional pardon.

Governor Macquarie did not approve of couples living together. They were encouraged to marry. On 23rd December 1810, David (Burns) and Ann (Griffin) were married by Banns in St John's Church, Parramatta. The Rev Samuel Marsden performed the ceremony. Both David and Ann signed with an X mark.
On 29 December their second son John Byrnes was born at Parramatta. He was baptised at St John's Church of England on 30th May 1814.

On June 1, 1815 Hester Burn (Esther) was born at Parramatta. She was baptised on 10th May 1818vi. The fifth child Catharine Sophia Burns was born 21st March 1819 at Parramatta. A convict sentence was considered to annul a prior marriage if it existed. Thus David’s previous marriage in Ireland was no impediment to this marriage.

The First Byrnes family
David Burns and Ann Reffin's first son, James Byrnes was born in 1806- possibly on 19th May. David appears to have been appointed a Petty Constable for the town of Parramatta in 1806. Colonel Patterson who had been appointed as Governor after Governor Bligh was overthrown in the Rum Rebellion of 1808 granted him a conditional pardon in 1809. This pardon was revoked when Governor Macquarie was appointed in 1810. On February 4, 1810 their second child Ann Byrns was born. On 11 March Ann Reffin's seven year sentence was completed and she was issued with a Certificate of Pardon on 1 June 1810.

During 1810 David was reappointed as a Petty Constable for Parramatta. Constables were chosen to help keep order in the populace. As you can imagine the population was largely made up of convicted criminals, and petty theft and more violent crimes were common. The Constables were expected to help to keep public order and in return were given some privileges such as annual provision of clothes, food rations and early emancipation from their convict sentences. During that year David also petitioned Governor Macquarie to reissue him with a pardon. This was not granted and David made another petition in 1812. This time he was successful. On 31 January 1813 David Burns was again granted a Conditional pardon.

Governor Macquarie did not approve of couples living together. They were encouraged to marry. On 23rd December 1810, David (Burns) and Ann (Griffin) were married by Banns in St John's Church, Parramatta. The Rev Samuel Marsden performed the ceremony. Both David and Ann signed with an X mark.
On 29 December their second son John Byrnes was born at Parramatta. He was baptised at St John's Church of England on 30th May 1814.

On June 1, 1815 Hester Burn (Esther) was born at Parramatta. She was baptised on 10th May 1818vi. The fifth child Catharine Sophia Burns was born 21st March 1819 at Parramatta.

http://byrnesshare.zoomshare.co/file/The_Castlereagh_Connection.pdf 
Byrnes, David (I954)
 
2 Ann Reffin arrived in Port Jackson from England aboard the Experiment on 24 June 1804. Ann's surname underwent many spelling variations when it was recorded in the colony. It is possible that she was born on 27th January and Christened on 23rd February 1783 at Walton on the Wolds, Leicester, England. If she is the Ann Reffin referred to in these English parish records, her parents were John and Ann Reffin. It appears John (Ralphon) married Ann Ward at Prestwold on 29th Sep 1780. The spelling of the name in England appears to have been variable showing in the earliest records as Ralphyn or Ralphin but it also appears as Reffin. Prestwold and Walton on the Wolds are located in Leicestershire. (The word Wold refers to a tract of open rolling country)

Ann was to be put on trial at Nottingham Assizes on 11th March 1803 for a burglary at Ruddington. Ruddington is about 20km north of her suggested birthplace and it is not known how she came to move there, nor at this stage do we know what she stole. She was sentenced to be executed. Two weeks later she was reprieved and sentenced to 7 years transportation. She spent some months waiting for transportation - this time was probably spent on the Hulks. She was put aboard the Experiment, which left England on 4th December 1803. There were 2 male and 136 female convicts on board. It was damaged in a storm, returned St Mary’s Walton le Wold built 1739 to port and set out again on 2 January 1804 and took 173 days to reach Port Jackson but it could not dock for 3 days due to adverse winds.

In those days females were often given harsh sentences for minor crimes and then transported to help redress the imbalances of the sexes in the new colony. Upon arrival in the colony the women were destined for the Female Factory from where they could be assigned to a position as a servant. Often the youngest and most attractive women would be selected by the military officers, then the remainder by non-commissioned officers and eventually by the ex-convict settlers who were allowed to have a female servant. These servants were often involved in more intimate relationships with their masters. If their services proved unsatisfactory they could be returned to the Factory. David must have been well regarded by the authorities to be allowed a partner while he was still a convict. It may also suggest that Ann’s appearance was somewhat ordinary as she was not chosen by more highly ranked men. We have no other indication of her physical appearance.

http://byrnesshare.zoomshare.com/file/The_Castlereagh_Connection.pdf 
Ann Reffin (I951)
 
3 Archives at Stanford Dingley show that on 1/2/1836,? a Martha Millson and her two children, Richard (7) and Martha (9) went into the Bradfield Workhouse, and on the 14th. March, Martha was discharged; she went back to get her children (no date) and was living with another man to whom she had a child.

Bradfield Workhouse is two miles from Stanford Dingley. Richard came to Australia aboard "John and Lucy," on 6/5/1857. No trace is found of Martha since. Under the law then you could marry again if you were separated by sea for seven years.

The register notes that their father was "transported in
1831" and that their mother was "living with another man by whom she has had a child, and deserted Richard and Martha.".

Only one week after they had been admitted Martha herself turned up at the door of the workhouse "expecting (hoping might have been a better word) to be allowed something for her children rather than keep her in.". Her attempt to avoid the dreaded House failed, and on 8th February she was herself admitted.

The register states "Husband transported. Mother of paupers 95 and 96 (i.e. Richard and Martha). Has another child, a bastard." She stood it for just over five weeks and then asked to leave "For fear of leaving her Work till she lost her place altogether.". The discharge register records that the family was "Clean and decent"; that their behaviour in the House was "Good"; and that they were "very industrious".

Richard Milson was to survive the hardships of his childhood, and, in 1857 he arrived in N.S.W. on the "John and Lucy" in order to join his father in Aberdeen. 
Bearfield, Martha (I136)
 
4 Arrived Australia: 1827

Patrick Conlon lived in Port Macquarie, New South Wales, on 21 May 1840. 
John Conlon, Patrick (I98)
 
5 By 1840 the population of the Lower North Shore had increased to a level where serious thought could be given to the establishment of schools and churches in the area. To translate these thoughts into realities a meeting was convened in early 1843 by James Milson of Careening Cove, Alexander Berry and his brother-in-law Edward Wollstonecraft, merchants of North Sydney, William Miller, Assistant Commissary General, Thomas Walker, and the celebrated artist Conrad Martens. All six men were to leave their names on the Lower North Shore.

By 1840 the population of the Lower North Shore had increased to a level where serious thought could be given to the establishment of schools and churches in the area. To translate these thoughts into realities a meeting was convened in early 1843 by James Milson of Careening Cove, Alexander Berry and his brother-in-law Edward Wollstonecraft, merchants of North Sydney, William Miller, Assistant Commissary General, Thomas Walker, and the celebrated artist Conrad Martens. All six men were to leave their names on the Lower North Shore.

 
Milson, James (I382)
 
6 Charles Millson/Milsom, a carpenter by profession, was involved in the Agricultural ("Captain Swing") riots of 1830 in Berkshire. He was tried for "machine breaking" in Reading on 27 Dec 1830 and sentenced to 14 years transportation.

He arrived in Sydney on 25 June 1831 and after a short period at Hyde park Barracks was assigned to Thomas Potter Macqueen on Segenhoe station near Scone. He was granted a ticket of Leave on 26 Sept 1835 and an Absolute Pardon on 2 April 1837. After marriage, Charles and Annie stayed in the Aberdeen area. Annie was accidentally killed by the kick of a horse at Overton near Muswellbrook in 1865. Charles spent the later part of his life living in the Armidale area.

Indent of the convict ship, "Eleanor."

CHARLES MILLSON; aged 28; Protestant; can read and write; Married with 1 male, 1 female child. Five feet two and a half inches tall; Dark ruddy complexion; Dark brown hair and eyes;

CHARLES MILLSON was convicted and sentenced to deportation in Australia, on the 27/12/1830, for breaking machinery; He sailed from Spithead on 19/2/1831, aboard the Eleanor. Was pardoned by decree of the King on 1/10/1836. Was sent to Segenhoe, Aberdeen, N.S.W. Judy Whites Book on "Billtrees", describes an old cottage built there in 1832, by C.H.Sempill, (who also owned Segenhoe,) With stone masons, sawyers, and carpenters, assigned convicts sent from Segenhoe. As a carpenter Charles most likely worked on it.






 
Millson, Charles (I135)
 
7 Convict: Transported 27 JAN 1820 Arrived "Prince Regent"

Occupation: Coppersmith, tinsmith

Burial: 27 APR 1835 St Phillips Church of England, Sydney

On 26 May 1819 Thomas was tried at the Old Bailey, London, and convicted of 'feloniously having in his custody and possession three forged bank notes for payment of 1 pound each, well knowing them to be forged'. For this he was sentenced to transportation for fourteen years. His common law wife, Sarah Ward, had the previous year also been convicted at the Old Bailey of passing forged bank notes. He was 40 years old at this time.

Thomas was transported to New South Wales aboard the 'Prince Regent'. The convicts were embarked in August 1819. The ship arrived in Sydney on 27 January 1820, its Master being William Anderson and its Surgeon Jas. Hunter. There were no fatalities amongst the convicts during the course of the voyage. However during the voyage a member of the Royal Scots guard aboard the ship absented himself from the guard of the 'Prince Regent' without leave and was given 150 lashes aboard the 'Lord Sidmouth'. He later apparently committed suicide by jumping overboard as the ship neared her destination, Port Jackson.

1822 Muster: Thomas Porter, Convict, "Prince Regent", 14 years sentence, Government Servant, living with his wife Sarah Ward, Sydney. Children listed: James 10 yo came free, Charles 8 yo came free, Mary Ann 6 yo came free, William 1.5 born in colony". His religion was Church of England. 
Family F28
 
8 DESCRIPTION OF THE BATTLE FOR LONE PINE: 1915 by Hugh ANDERSON

The battle for Lone Pine, involving the Australian 1st Brigade plus two other battalions, was a crushing victory for the Australians but at a horrendous cost to both sides.

The Australians lost 80 officers and 2197 men in the four days the battle lasted. The attack started at 5.30pm on 6 August with the Australians taking Lone Pine by 6pm, but the battle continued until 10 August as the Turks counter attacked. The Turks lost almost 7000 men of the 16th Division. No fewer than seven Victoria Crosses were awarded to Australian troops.

Hugh Anderson took part in the heroic Australian attack. He was badly wounded and ended up in hospital at Heliopolis for several months from where he wrote to his parents on 6 January 1916, describing his role in the battle.

"I hope the censor will let it pass after all these months," he wrote. "We knew several days before that we were to charge the Lone Pine trenches. I was glad as I had come over for the adventure and this seemed what I was looking for.

"We were issued with a white strip of calico to sew on to each arm and a big patch for the back, this was for the artillery to show where our men were, and also made a good mark for Johnie as we soon found to our cost. We were then told what we were to take over with us and our officer gave us a rough sketch of the trenches and told us what was expected of us, and what we had to do.

"On August 6th we paraded just after 3 o'clock in battle order and marched round to our trenches opposite the Lone Pine. The whole of the first division was to do the job, the 1st Battalion formed the first line and were in our advanced firing line, the 2nd Battalion were in the main firing line in the firing positions, and the 4th Battalion were in the bottom of the trench just behind them. The 3rd Battalion were the reserves and came over twenty minutes after we started. The brigade went in a little over 3000 strong and came out something over 400, so the casualties were very heavy.

"We got to our positions about 4pm and the artillery commenced bombarding the Turkish trenches and they returned the compliment and the crash and scream of shells was deafening for a little over an hour, the smell of explosives was very strong and the suspense of waiting tried our nerves. I was nervous I can tell you and put up many a prayer for courage. I bet others did also.

"About 5pm the officers were all there with watch in hand calling 3 minutes to go, 2 minutes to go, 1 minute to go half a minute to go and shut his watch and three shrill blasts of a whistle. Out scrambled the boys from advanced line up through holes in the ground, the trench being a tunnel. Over the parapet go the 2nd Battalion and we are close behind. I will never forget that picture, I was well up with the rest racing like mad, all nervousness gone now. The shrapnel falling as thick as hail, many a good man went down here although I never noticed it at the time.

"We reached the Turkish lines and found the first trench covered in with logs and branches and dirt heaped on top. There was a partial check, some men fired in through the loop holes, others tried to pull the logs apart. Out runs our officer, old Dickie Seldon, waving a revolver, 'This won't do men! On! On! On!' and running over the top of the trench he came to the second trench and down into it the crowd followed.

"I got alongside of Captain Milson of Milson's Point. I slid down into the trench, the Turks ran round a corner and got into a large cave place dug in the trench side as a bomb proof shelter. The first man to follow was shot dead, here we were checked. Captain Milson took command. A bomber came on the parapet and commenced throwing bombs round the corner among the Turks. Very soon he was shot in the arm, and said he was useless and threw his bags of' bombs down to us, several rolled away and out rushed a Turk to try and get them. I shot at him but never hit, and he got back quick.

"Milson started throwing, and I was next to him lighting bombs for him. He then proposed getting a party the other side of this possie and bombing from both sides and asked if we would follow him. We all said 'yes' so he threw a bomb and dashed across. A dozen Turks shot him and he fell dead the other side. I was next and as I ran I threw my rifle into the possie and pulled the trigger. I suppose they had never got time to load as I never got hit, but no one followed and I was there alone with no bombs and only my rifle. I shouted to them to come on but they were not having any.

"I felt a little dickie I can tell you, but I kept firing into the possie from where I was, some of the Turks were firing at me, and I knew it but I could not get away. Wack! Like a sledge hammer on the head and down I went across Milson's body and several Turks, some of whom were only wounded, and groaned and squirmed from time to time. I bled pretty freely and then I got a crack on the shoulder from a shrapnel pellet which hurt badly but did not do much damage.

"Our men meanwhile were still bombing away and one bomb went off near my head, and I got bits of it in the hand and face and was knocked unconscious for a while. The next I remembered is a rush of feet and being trampled on. I lay very still and there was a big shooting and bombing match going on all round and back rushed the Turks over me leaving a heap of dead and wounded. I was very dry and tried to get Milson's water bottle, my own being empty, but could not. I tried to get my rifle but it was jamed between the bodies. Milson's revolver was handy, and I ought to have used that as I had a good view of the Turk's possie from where I was, but I did not have brains enough at the time.

"Soon I heard someone call behind me 'Hullo Australia' and I crawled down the trench and found Seldon with one eye shot out, but still going, leading a party and I explained the position to him and he sent me away to a temporary dressing station while he went and fixed up the Turks. They captured 15 Turks and 1 German Officer for that position.

"I got my head bandaged and a drink of rum and felt better, I picked up a rifle and was going round to the firing line when I came across Crichton's body with a frightful gash in it, further on our Corporal's with a bayonet hole through his back and chest. I went on and was set to dig in the now captured trench. There was only a man every 20 yards or so and we had to pass messages to head quarters for reinforcements and sandbags. They were still fighting on the flanks, the right most especially under Captain Scot, he got a DCM for this. I was taken off to collect arms and ammunition from dead and it was heavy work.

"As darkness come on reinforcements arrived, and I went into the firing line and stood on guard with them. While I was working and hot my head did not trouble me, but when it was cold it started to ache, and I had a bad time all night. I left the trenches on Saturday and how I was sent to Lemnos you already know."

Hugh Anderson went on to fight in France where he was killed in the second Battle of Bullecourt on 5 May 1917. He is commemorated at the Villers-Brettoneux Memorial dedicated to more than 10,000 Australian soldiers who fell in battlefields of the Somme, Aras and the "Hundred Days" and who have no known grave. 
Milson, Stewart (I406)
 
9 FIRST FLEET

An Account of his life by a relative: John Williams

The late 18th century was a cruel era, with floggings of several hundred lashes for trifling offences, and huge crowds at public hangings. On a Saturday night in January 1783, David Kilpack, my great-great-great grandfather, was 'making merry' at Clapham in London. He was apprehended with a bag over his shoulder containing two cocks, two hens, two ducks and one gander, each of them worth a shilling.

He told Justice Buller at the Old Bailey that he had found them in the street, and 'supposed they had been dropped from some cart or wagon'. The judge's verdict: 'Guilty. Transported for seven years.' But the boat to Australia didn't leave till May 1787, four and a half years later.

It arrived in January 1788 after a 252-day voyage. Kilpack's ship, Scarborough, was the worst in the first fleet, but hopefully not as bad as the ships in the second, on which his wife-to-be travelled. These were equipped by the firm which had designed the living quarters for slaves being transported from Africa to America on the notorious 'Middle Passage'. The convicts' ankle-irons were rigid bolts some nine inches long, and just to walk was to risk breaking a leg.

In his bestselling account of the convict era, The Fatal Shore, Robert Hughes describes conditions on one second fleet ship, Surprize: 'In a heavy sea, the water sluiced through her. The starving prisoners lay chilled to the bone on soaked bedding, unexercised, crusted with salt, shit and vomit, festering with scurvy and boils.' One prisoner wrote to his parents, who printed the letter as a broadsheet: 'When any of our comrades that were chained to us died, we kept it a secret as long as we could for the smell of the dead body, in order to get their allowance of provision, and many a time have I been glad to eat the poultice that was put to my leg for perfect hunger.' Such men and women were emphatically not willing settlers intending to spoil a paradise. But their experiences may have left them so brutalized that they were quite unprepared to meet people of a totally different culture -- let alone 'conciliate their affections'. Between 156,000 and 162,000 men, women and children were sent to the other end of the earth before transportation ended in 1868. As the decades passed, conditions for convicts improved -- and many free settlers arrived.

David Kilpack was granted a conditional pardon in December 1794, by which time he had married Eleanor MacDonald, who had stolen four linen sheets. They had four children, and in 1795 were granted a lease of 80 acres of land at a quarterly rental of one shilling. One of the Kilpacks' descendants became a respected High Court judge.

Ann account from James Stanley Milson:

David Kilpack's background is interesting, originally sentenced to transportation to the Americas for stealing an amount of poultry. He was held aboard a prison hulk in Thames River pending the outcome of the American war of independence.

He and some forty or so fellow prisoners escaped from the hulk ( SWIFT ) by swimming to the Thames embankment. Though his hard swim to freedom did not last very long. He was recaptured after only two days and appeared once more before a magistrate. This time he was re-sentenced to death. However by the grace and mercy etc. of King George 111 the sentence was commuted to life imprisonment in the colony yet-to-be at Sydney. 
Kilpack, David (I384)
 
10 GOLCAR, HUDDERSFIELD, YORKSHIRE

LEASE DATED 3 MARCH 1839


A single large sheet vellum Indenture being a Lease for a year of a property in Golcar, Huddersfield in the County of York dated 3 March 1839, Joseph Whitwham to William Sykes



William SYKES

Clothier, of Town End, Golcar, Huddersfield, Yorkshire. Buying property from Joseph Whitwham by this Lease and a Release intended to bear date the next day



Benjamin SYKES

Clothier, of Share Hill, Golcar, Huddersfield. Party to Indenture of Release intended to bear date the next day 
Sykes, John (I30)
 
11 Information compiled by Pat Curry

19 May 1806

Birthdate of James Byrnes, according to the headstone on his grave. His parents were David Byrnes and Ann Reffin.
'
4 February 1810

James’ first sister, Ann, was born at Parramatta.
23 Dec 1810

James’ parents, David and Ann, (surnames shown as Burns and Griffin), were married by Reverend Samuel Marsden at St John’s Church, Parramatta. David is believed to be about 42 years of age and Ann 27.

1813 - 1826

James’ sisters and brothers were born, John in 1813, Esther in 1815, Catherine Sophia in 1819 and Samuel in 1826. James was 20 years old when Samuel arrived.
6 August 1827

James’ future wife, a young woman named Harriet Nicholson arrived in Sydney as a convict aboard the Princess Charlotte. The shipping indent records her as 20 years old, a straw bonnet maker, native of Nottingham, charged at Doncaster with picking pockets, and sentenced to 7 years transportation. In Sydney, she was assigned to Doctor David Ramsay of Dobroyd.

19 Nov 1827

The first Byrnes’ family marriage – Ann Byrnes married William Jackson at St John’s at Parramatta. James Byrnes and Mary Campbell were recorded as the official witnesses.
November 1828

The 1828 Census of NSW recorded James Byrnes at Parramatta with his parents, sisters and brothers, all except Esther who, at the age of 13 years, was a servant working for Peter Bemi, a draftsman in the Surveyor General’s office in Sydney. This Census shows Harriet Nicholson was at Parramatta, assigned to the Reverend John Vincent, who had only recently arrived in the colony with his wife and 4 young children.

10 August 1829

James’ future wife attempted to marry. The Convict Permission to Marry records show that the Reverend William Cowper of St Phillip’s Church Sydney approved the marriage of Harriet Nicholson, not to James Byrnes, but to John Redgrave, who had arrived free per the Morley in 1823 as a 12 year old. Harriet did not marry John Redgrave. This record reveals discrepancies in Harriet’s story as told to James Rutledge in the book, Spark of Grace – History of the Methodist Church, by the Reverend Gloster Udy, (Epworth Press, 1977). That story claimed that Harriet had asked for permission to marry James Byrnes, but that her mistress would not give permission, as she was too good a servant to lose. Harriet further claimed that she and James had concocted a plan that would have her sent back to the Female Factory at Parramatta for misbehaviour, so that James could visit there and choose her for a wife. Harriet’s application to marry John Redgrave was made at Parramatta.

15 May 1830

Convict Permission to Marry records show that, 9 months later, the Reverend Yate of Parramatta approved Harriet Nicholson’s marriage to James Byrnes, with a notation added: Approval is granted provided Harriet’s employer consents, as it appears that she does not have her Ticket-of-leave as represented.

26 July 1830

James Byrnes and Harriet Nicholson were married at St John’s at Parramatta. Witnesses were William and Ann Jackson. Coincidentally perhaps, John Redgrave, whom Harriet had earlier received permission to marry, was married the same day to Ann Barnett in St Phillip’s Church in Sydney.

20 Aug 1832

James’ second sister, Esther, married John Wilkinson at St John’s Church, Parramatta. Witnesses were Robert and Mary Biddle. Where were the family members?

4 Feb 1833

James’ third sister, Catherine Sophia Byrnes, 14 years old but recorded as being 15, married convict William Harris, aged 26, at Bringelly. William Harris was assigned to Geo. Wentworth of Greendale. James and Harriet Byrnes were the official witnesses of the marriage and they are recorded as "Of Bringelly" indicating that they also lived there at that time.

21 July 1833

Esther Byrnes and John Wilkinson’s first child, John, was born near Bringelly His baptism record states that his father was a tenant farmer for Geo. Wentworth at Greendale. At this time James and Harriet Byrnes, Esther and John Wilkinson, and Catherine Sophia and William Harris seem to be all in the area recorded as Bringelly. Samuel aged 7, would have been at Parramatta with his parents, and it is not known where 20 year old John Byrnes was.

1836

NSW Post Office Directory recorded David Byrnes as a tailor at Parramatta.

19 May 1838

First evidence of any of James Byrnes’ family member in the Castlereagh area. Catherine Byrnes and William Harris’ first child, Rachel, was born at Castlereagh. William was recorded as a settler when Rachel was baptized by the Reverend Henry Fulton in July 1838.

8 July 1838

Catherine Sophia Harris nee Byrnes died at Castlereagh and was buried at Christ Church Cemetery. This was our first Byrnes family burial at this cemetery. Who cared for daughter Rachel, who was baptized the same day her mother was buried?
21 Oct 1838

James’ brother John Byrnes and Eliza Ablett married at Cobbitty near Bringelly. The witnesses at their marriage were John and Mary Ford – the Wilkinson and Ford children married each other in later years.

6 July 1839

The lease on David Byrnes’ land at Parramatta was extinguished. Perhaps James’ parents then moved to Castlereagh to live with some of their children.

26 July 1839

James’ mother, Ann Byrnes nee Reffin died at Castlereagh and was buried in Christ Church cemetery by the Reverend Henry Fulton. She was recorded as 56 years old. David was 70 years old, but youngest son Samuel was only 13. Later evidence suggests James’ close association with his brother Samuel.

29 Oct 1839

Catherine and William Harris’ baby daughter Rachel died and was buried at Christ Church Cemetery at Castlereagh. It is known that William moved to Bathurst where he married Elenor Evans in 1841.

19 Aug 1840

John Byrnes and Eliza Ablett’s first child was born at Castlereagh and named Catherine Sophia Byrnes. James and Harriet, John and Eliza, father David and brother Samuel are all there too. Esther and John Wilkinson stayed at Greendale with their 5 children. It is not known where William and Ann Jackson and their 3 children were living then.

7 Jan 1841

Spark of Grace (Gloster Udy, 1977) quotes James Rutledge’s 1840-47 Journal about Harriet Byrnes (nee Nicholson) - First there was Mrs Byrnes who led the way. This story details Harriet’s religious conversion and later her work with 3 other local women – Mrs John Lees Jnr, Mrs Gorman, and Mrs Stanton – who held weekly tea-meetings to raise funds to re-build the Wesleyan Church at Castlereagh.

1841

The Penrith Methodist Circuit Centenary Booklet (Margaret Trask, 1961) records James Byrnes and his young brother, Samuel, aged 15, as Trustees of the Methodist Church at Castlereagh.

19 Feb 1841

Caroline Deborah Jackson, 3 years, daughter of Ann Byrnes and William Jackson, was buried at Christ Church Cemetery. Was Ann living at Castlereagh or only visiting her family there when Caroline died?

24 March 1846

James’ youngest brother, Samuel, aged 21, married Eliza Lewis, aged 22, at the Wesleyan Church at Castlereagh. Eliza was the daughter of George Lewis and Sarah Fredericks of Castlereagh.

5 Aug 1847

Ann Byrnes husband, William Jackson, died at Parramatta and was buried there. There is no evidence that he ever lived at Castlereagh. Neither is there evidence that he did not.

16 Sept 1847

Ann Byrnes/Jackson remarried – to Thomas Harland, widower, at Windsor, five weeks after William’s death.

25 March 1848

James Byrnes’ father, David Byrnes, died at Castlereagh. He was buried in Christ Church Cemetery, by the Minister Reverend John Vincent, then at Castlereagh.

7 March 1854

Samuel Byrnes married for the 2nd time, to Eliza Gorman, in the Wesleyan Church at Windsor. Eliza Gorman was aged 18 years old, the eldest daughter of Sarah Lees and Henry Gorman. James Byrnes and Sarah Gorman were official witnesses to the marriage. Samuel’s first wife had evidently died although there are no records relating to her after the birth of Alfred Roy Byrnes in 1851. Family stories report that she fell from a sulky in her driveway.

1856

The Electoral List for the North Riding of Cumberland County in 1856 recorded James Byrnes as the owner of a dwelling house at Mt Pleasant; his brother Samuel Byrnes as having a leasehold property there.

1861

The Methodist Centenary Circuit Centenary booklet documents James Byrnes as a Trustee of the Methodist Church at Penrith in 1861, as well as a Class Leader at Castlereagh and Lower Castlereagh.

11 May 1865

James’ wife, Harriet, died at Castlereagh at the age of 56 years, recorded as 59 on her death certificate. She died of paralysis after one day – perhaps a stroke? Wesleyan Minister Woolnough officiated at her burial in Christ Church cemetery at Castlereagh. Records for the Methodist cemetery show that burials were occurring there at that time, but perhaps James decided to bury her with his parents and other family members in Christ Church rather than in the Methodist cemetery? Harriet’s maiden name was recorded as Parkins instead of Nicholson. James Byrnes and C Kirkparkins were the official witnesses of her burial.

1865-66

Some of James Byrnes’ nephews and nieces settled in the Castlereagh area. John and Eliza Byrnes’ daughters, Sarah and Harriet, married David and Alfred Wilkinson at Castlereagh in 1865 and 1866. David and Alfred were the children of Esther and John Wilkinson, so these couples are first-cousins. Esther ’s husband John died in 1863, after which she moved to the Rylstone area with her younger children. Henry, Alfred, and David Wilkinson settled in Castlereagh, although Alfred later moved to Sofala. Henry and David remained in the Nepean area all their lives.

29 Jan 1876

James Byrnes died after 11 years of widowhood. The cause of death is shown as 9 days of low fever. His death certificate recorded his deceased wife as Harriet Parkins rather than Nicholson. His brothers John and Samuel were the official witnesses of his death. James was buried at Christ Church Cemetery by the Reverend John Vaughan, the Church of England Minister. James’ headstone is still standing.

James Byrnes’ headstone carries the words "Erected by Jane Brownlow" around the top of it. What was her connection to him? Family stories say that she had lived with James and Harriet as a servant when a young girl, and had stayed on as James’ housekeeper after Harriet’s death.

1878

Two years after James Byrnes’ death, Jane Brownlow married Michael Long, a widower with 6 children. Family stories say they lived in James Byrnes’ house. Michael Long went on to become a prominent person in Penrith, serving 9 times as its Mayor. When Jane died in 1911, her obituary reported her as of a religious and retiring disposition, and a person who had not been separated from her home and family for 19 years.

A final interesting point. In 1911, William Freame, a noted historian, writing for the Nepean Times newspaper, recorded Michael Long’s Reminiscences of Penrith including its people. Michael named many Castlereagh families of past times, but did not mention any of the Byrnes family members.

Other information: In the Minutes Book of Penrith Council for 1872 [now in Penrith Library, Local History collection], on Page 75] there is mention of a James Byrnes being paid for gravel on Castlereagh Road. It was thought that this could possibly be 'our' James Byrnes although by that year he was at an advanced age. Other Penrith local records (Court records) were known to confirm that at least one of the Byrnes family worked at or was visiting Emu gravel quarry on the Nepean River (concerning a fight which broke out there). -- ( Thanks to Jan Koperberg for bringing to notice the 1872, page 75, mention ~ J.G. Byrnes, 2009. )

A) On 11 January 1872 James Byrnes for road work in McCarthy's Lane - 'tender by James Byrnes for works in McCarthys Lane at 14 pounds 10 shillings rejected; tender by P Cochrane at 8 shillings per chain; tender of James Landers Jnr at 15 pounds - tender by P Cochrane accepted".

B) On 4 July 1872: "tender of J W Byrnes accepted for delivery of gravel to No 1 Section of Castlereagh Road at 3 shillings sixpence per cubic yard - tender of Thomas Field accepted for delivery of gravel to No 2 Section of Castlereagh Road at 3 shillings per cubic yard - tender of Messrs Nelson and Coffrey accepted for delivery of gravel to No 3 Section of Castlereagh Road at 2 shillings per cubic yard - tender of James Mills for building two culverts on Castlereagh Road for 5 pounds accepted - tender of George Jordan for supply of man, horse and tip dray when required at 6 shillings per day accepted ..."

As the 'original'/elder James Byrnes was elderly in 1872 (he died 1876 at Birds Eye Corner, aged 69) one doubts he would have been wanting to shovel or lifting too much gravel. There was a James Byrnes born in Castlereagh to parents John Byrnes and Eliza Aplet?/Ablett? but he was only 12 in 1872. However, another James Byrnes born at Castlereagh was son of Samuel Byrnes and Eliza Lewis. That James was aged 26 in 1872 and hence is the prime possibility.

The people tendering to repair or improve their road may have been the locals .. e.g. Thomas Field presumably lived locally (Upper Castlereagh); and also the James Landers Jnr who tendered in 1872 for the road improvement likely did too (i.e. there was a 'Landers Inn' a little way further north along Castlereagh Road.

 
Byrnes, James (I955)
 
12 James Danby of Thorpe and Farnley, Yorkshire. Knight of the Body.

Son of Thomas Danby(q.v.). (D.N.B. Supp.I p.110 and Coronation p.331) = Agnes, daughter of Sir John Langton of Farnley (q.v.). (Coronation p.272)

Had a son, Christopher. (Coronation p.331)

5 Nov. 1461 He and Thomas Conyers were mainpernors for Sir Robert Danby(q.v.) and Thomas Witham. (C.F.R.1461-71 p.39)

7 Jul. 1466 Commitment to him and Thomas Conyers of the keeping of land in Sowerby by Thirsk. (ibid. p.183)

14 Jul. 1468 Commitment to him and Thomas Conyers of the keeping of land in Sowerby by Thirsk. (ibid.p.242)

1469 A feoffee of Sir William Parr(q.v.). (Coronation p.331)

19 Nov.1470 On a commission of the peace for the West Riding. (C.P.R.1467-77 p.638)

3 0 Nov.1480 On a commission of the peace for the North Riding. (C.P.R.1476-85 p.579)

1482 Knighted by Richard in Scotland. (L.L.L.p.51)

14 May 1483 On a commission of the peace for the North Riding. (C.P.R.1476-85 p.579)

2 6 Jun. On a commission of the peace for the North Riding. (ibid.p.579)

6 Jul. At the coronation. (Coronation p.272)

5 Dec. On a commission of the peace for the North Riding. (C.P.R.1476-85 p.579)

10 Dec. On a commission to assess subsidies and appoint collectors in Yorkshire. (C.P.R.1476-85 p.394)

1484 He, his brother, Robert, and their wives were admitted to the Corpus Christi Guild. (Coronation p.331)

18 Feb. On a commission to assess subsidies and appoint collectors in Yorkshire. (C.P.R.1476-85 p.425)

6 Mar. Appointed Master of the King’s Hounds. (ibid.p.438)

1 May On a commission of array for Yorkshire. (ibid.p.401)

8 Dec. On commissions of array for the North and West Ridings. (ibid.p.492)

22 Aug.1485 Possibly at Bosworth. (Coronation p.330)

7 Aug.1490 On a commission to investigate a complaint against Sir John Saville and others by the tenants of Sowerby, Warley and elsewhere. (C.P.R.1485-94 pp.325-6)

7 Apr.1497 Writ of diem clausit extremum. (C.F.R.1485-1509 p.243)

> http://books.google.com/books?id=SWgKAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA49

You said that "We can see however from this source that Agnes married to James Danby was not the daughter of John Langton, but rather the widow of his deceased son, also John."

This summary of the will of John Langton (dated 6 Edward IV, not 4 Edward IV as you previously stated) is taken from (and cites) vol. 30 of the Publications of the Surtees Society, which is vol. 2 of Testamenta Eboracensia. Both the summary here and the full text and comments in Test. Ebor. say clearly that Agnes Langton (m. Sir James Danby) was the daughter (not the widow) of the deceased son of John Langton, the testator in this will.

This is the text in the summary you cited: "Agnes, daughter of my son John Langton, now dead, and now wife of the said James Danby". If you check the actual text of the will in Test. Ebor. 2:177-8, you'll see that its more archaic English (modernized in the summary) says exactly the same thing. There certainly is no indication that Agnes was a widow of a John Langton when she married Sir James Danby. Do you agree?

The information in Test. Ebor. on the wills of John Langton and his mother Euphemia support at least the order and rough dates of the John Langtons as given by John Watson, although they don't give full details on the wives. The order is:

1) Sir John Langton (d. 17 Mar 1459)

2) John Langton (will dated 22 Dec 6 Edward IV)

3) John Langton (will dated 4 Dec 1452)

4) Agnes Langton, m. Sir James Danby

This is clearly in disagreement with the source I cited earlier (Wheater's "History of the Parishes of Sherburn and Cawood"). Wheater apparently depended on Hopkinson's MSS of Yorkshire pedigrees, and his version appears to match a Langton pedigree in Thoresby's Ducatus Leodiensis, which is sharply criticized by the editor of Test. Ebor.
Accordingly, Wheater should probably be discarded as an authority on at least these generations of the family.

John Wilson, can you provide sources for the line of Langtons that you laid out?

BTW (for those who may be interested) these Langtons are ancestral to Prince William - and of course his brother Harry, who has had so much "exposure" recently! :-)  
Danby, Sir James (I1075)
 
13 James MILSON and Elizabeth KILPACK

MILSON, JAMES (1783-1872), farmer, was born on 25 November 1783 at Grantham, Lincolnshire, England. He arrived in Sydney in the Albion in August 1806 and obtained employment on a farm at the Field of Mars (near Ryde). On 8 January 1810 at St Philip's Church, Sydney, he married Elizabeth Kilpack (1793-1850), his employer's daughter; he then described himself as 'servant and labourer'. By June 1820 he was living on a grant of 100 acres (40 ha) at Pennant Hills, where he ran 40 cattle. He had too little pasture for them and asked for more land. His request was supported by Robert Campbell who had been a fellow passenger in the Albion. In 1824 he was authorized to select 300 acres (121 ha) near Pennant Hills but when he was informed that this land had been granted to another he sought 50 acres (20 ha) at North Shore and 300 (121 ha) farther inland. By 1825 he was farming on the North Shore of Sydney Harbour; his house there was burnt down in a bush fire in November 1826 and the title deeds of his land at Castle Hill and Hunter's Hill were destroyed.

In the 1828 census he was recorded as a landholder, of Hunter's Hill, occupying 1600 acres (648 ha), with 220 cattle; in his will, signed in July 1829, he listed 220 acres (89 ha) purchased at Castle Hill, 640 acres (259 ha) at Wallumbie (Wollombi), 50 acres (20 ha) granted by Governor Brisbane at North Shore, and 5 acres (2 ha) on Neutral Harbour (Bay). In 1823-24 Milson was employed as 'keeper' of Government House. In 1832 he built on the North Shore a reservoir for watering ships. In later years he acquired more land and was a keen yachtsman. He died in Sydney on 25 October 1872, survived by four sons and one of his two daughters.

His eldest son James Milson (1814-1903), was born on 25 November 1814 at the Field of Mars in Sydney and educated at Dr O'Halloran's school, which he left at 16 to serve his mercantile apprenticeship with the Sydney agency of the Liverpool firm of Aspinall, Brown & Co. On his majority, he became a partner in the firm of Robert Campbell junior, his capital being provided by his father. Milson soon gained a wide knowledge of shipowning, importing and wool-buying, and won repute as one of Sydney's most progressive businessmen. The economic crisis in 1841-45 embarrassed the firm of Robert Campbell junior, its credit being over-extended and its bad debts numerous. It was wound up, and in 1846 Milson went into business on his own account. He built up a thriving mercantile concern in Sydney and in the 1850s embarked on pastoral ventures, especially in New England, where he bought Sugarloaf station in 1854. He began to interest himself in steam ferry services in Port Jackson and in September 1863 was one of the founders of the Milson's Point Ferry Co. which operated until March 1878, when it was sold and became the North Shore Ferry Co. In the 1860s Milson became a director of the Bank of New South Wales, the Colonial Sugar Refining Co., the Australian Gaslight Co., the Sydney Exchange and Assurance Co., and the Australian Steam Navigation Co. In 1868 he was deputy-mayor of East St Leonards and was the owner of Elamong and Cremorne estates. He acted as executor for his friend, W. C. Wentworth, and was associated with several other conservative politicians. In the 1870s, with other members of the Milson family, he took up pastoral holdings in central Queensland in conjunction with Oscar de Satgé, as well as on the Diamantina and Gregory Rivers.

Keenly interested in charities of various kinds, Milson was a director of the Sydney Sailors' Home and of the Benevolent Asylum. In 1881 he founded the Oberlin Friendly Aid Society 'to give friendly aid to cultured persons now indigent'. Like his father he was an enthusiastic yachtsman from the 1830s onwards and in 1862 was first vice-commodore of the Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron and commodore in 1863.

His 25-ton yacht Era was one of the best-known craft in Sydney in the 1860s. He was one of the first to see the possibilities of the Blue Mountains as a popular health resort. In his old age he opposed Federation.

Milson married twice: on 22 July 1852 to Marianne Grimes who died 5 November 1864, and on 24 November 1869 to Ann Stewart who died on 10 December 1888. He died on 13 January 1903, leaving three sons and three of his four daughters.
Select Bibliography

Historical Records of Australia, series 1, vol 16; R. H. Goddard, The Life and Times of James Milson (Melb, 1955); manuscript catalogue under J. Milson (State Library of New South Wales). More on the resources

Author: David S. Macmillan

Print Publication Details: David S. Macmillan, 'Milson, James (1814 - 1903)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 2, Melbourne University Press, 1967, pp 232-233 
Milson, James (I382)
 
14 James worked in a quarry for stone for ships' ballast in Careening Cove which was situated between Kirribilli and Kurraba Point, beside Neutral Bay. He established a slaughterhouse to provide the town across the harbour with fresh lamb and mutton.

He had his share if problems when he first settled in the area. In May 1814 the ship "Three Bees" caught fire at Government Wharf, Sydney Cove. She was loaded with thirty casks of gunpowder and her cannon was "all shotted". The ship was cut loose and her first gun went off at 6.30pm.and a ball landed near the guardhouse, another went through Captain Piper's parlour window. Altogether fourteen guns went off before she blew up. Some of the cannon balls were said to have crashed into Milson's boatshed on the North Shore.

In 1825 he was granted 50 acres between Lavender Bay and Careening Cove.

In 1826 bushfires ravaged the North Shore destroying his home and possessions, which included the title deeds and notes for his land grants. It also destroyed his fruit and vegetable crops.

Between 1832 and his death in 1872, a number of substantial houses were built on his land for his family. Whilst most of these building have since been demolished or greatly modified, some remain and are important features of North Sydney’s cultural heritage.“Carabella Cottage” was built in 1828 for his daughter and her husband, William Shairp, at the head of Careening Cove.

“Brisbane House” was built in 1831 for his second daughter Elizabeth, wife of R.T. Hall. “Wia Wia” was completed in 1834 for his son James. “Grantham” was built on the high ground as a residence for himself. Other houses associated with the family include “Elamang”, “Fern Lodge”, “Careena”, “The Hermitage” and a number of others in the vicinity.

Loreto was established in 1908. Loreto has changed significantly from the time it was first opened in 1907 until now in 2004.

The first building that was occupied and bought by the Loreto nuns was Elemang, which was built around 1850 by James Milson as a wedding present for his son. The Loreto Nuns bought elemang in 1907 and it was officially opened as a school in 1908. ... Over 40 years later in 1979 the Elemang was reconstructed and refurbished so that elemang could be changed into senior school staff rooms and in 1981 the construction was complete.

In 1922 The Alfred Milson’s House ‘coreena’ was bought and acquired for junior school and a residence for the new Loreto Boarders. ... In 1959 The Coreena was demolished and replaced as a junior school. ... The Junior School art rooms, principal and secretaries offices where extended and re-furbished, and the boys toilets where demolished in 1991. In 1997 computers had been placed in the junior school library and in 1999 the kitchen facilities where upgraded. 
Milson, James (I382)
 
15 John Davis Crime:
Convicted at: Middlesex Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: Life
Ship: England
Departure date: 28th April, 1826
Arrival date: 18th September, 1826
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 147 other convicts Crime:


83945 Davis John England 1826 1837 Merton GRC

Aged 28. Ticket of leave holder
John Davis Crime:
Convicted at: Middlesex Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: Life
Ship: England
Departure date: 28th April, 1826
Arrival date: 18th September, 1826
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 147 other convicts Crime:


Excerpt from the Surgeons Report on the Cornwall.

"TONNAGE: 870. Sailed from Gravesend on 12th. May 1839 and arrived on 1st. September 1839. 112 Days, on board were: 150 Adult Males. 101 Adult Females. Children: 50 Male; 74 Females; Infants 12.

Nine Males & Nine Females died on board. Main afflictions were Fever, Diarrhea, Scurvy, & with the children Rubella, Scarlet Fever, Bowel (infection) from the irritation of teething. No one was confined to bed during the last 6 weeks – good state of health on arrival. Five children born on board."

Excerpt from the journal of T Hatfull who sailed on the Cornwall.

"The Cornwall East India-man of 873 tons burden Class 1.Q., J. Somes Esq. owner., commanded by J.Cow Esq., left Deptford on Sunday May 5th 1839. towed by two steamboats and passed Greenwich Hospital at 3 o’clock p.m. She arrived at Gravesend at dusk the same evening, the following day the sailors were busy about the ships rigging etc. On Tuesday the 7th she received on board 387 Emigrants, Kentish People, comprising 150 men, 94 women & 143 children under 15 years, bound for Sydney, New South Wales."

Ship Name: England (1)
Rig Type: S.
Built: Chepstow
Build Year: 1814
Size (tons): 425

Voyage Details
Master: John Reay
Surgeon: George Thomson
Sailed: 6 May 1826
From: Downs
Arrived: 18 September 1826
Port: PJ
Route: Direct
Days Travel: 135
Convicts Landed: 148 males & 0 female convicts
Notes:

England was a 425-ton merchant ship built at Chepstow, Wales in 1814. She made two voyages transporting convicts from England to Australia.
Career

Under the command of John Reay and surgeon George Thomson, she left The Downs, England on 6 May 1826, with 148 male convicts and a detachment of the 39th (Dorsetshire) Regiment of Foot. She arrived in Sydney on 18 September 1826 and had no convict deaths en route. England departed Port Jackson in October bound for Canton.

On her second convict voyage under the command of James Blyth and surgeon Thomas Wilson, she left Sheerness, England on 4 April 1832, with 200 male convicts. She arrived in Hobart Town on 18 July 1832 and had two deaths en route.


Robyn Blackwood on 30th October, 2015 wrote:

John served his sentence and married Phyllis Ashenden (transported on the “Cornwall” in 1839) on 31 Oct 1842 at Scone, N.S.W. They had 16 children, 7 sons and 9 daughters (a baby daughter was stolen by natives and never recovered, whilst Phyllis was midwifing at a nearby property). John died at Stoney Batter, Kingstown located half way between Uralla and Bundarra in the New England area of New South Wales.

Convict Changes History

Robyn Blackwood on 30th October, 2015 made the following changes:

alias 1: Jack A Dandy, date of birth: April, 1807, date of death: 15th January, 1881  
Davis, John Daniel (I164)
 
16 mILITARY sERVICE


Number 10230
Rank Private
Unit ASC [Army Service Corps] - May (1916) to August (1916) Reinforcements (May-September 1916)
Ship Name HMAT Marathon
Ship number A74
Date of embarkation 4 May 1916
Place of embarkation Sydney

Service Record

Name DICKINSON, SAMUEL WILLIAM

Service Australian Army
Service Number NX6425
Date of Birth 10 Sep 1904
Place of Birth SYDNEY, NSW
Date of Enlistment 7 Nov 1939
Locality on Enlistment HABERFIELD, NSW
Place of Enlistment MARRICKVILLE, NSW
Next of Kin DICKINSON, E
Date of Discharge 6 May 1942
Rank Corporal

Posting at Discharge AUSTRALIAN HEADQUARTERS GUARD BATTALION
WW2 Honours and Gallantry None for display
Prisoner of War No  
Dickinson, Samuel William (I263)
 
17 Military Service

MILSON, LANCELOT MANUEL
Service Royal Australian Air Force
Service Number 25448
Date of Birth 15 Nov 1914
Place of Birth ARMIDALE, NSW
Date of Enlistment 9 Apr 1941
Locality on Enlistment TYALGUM, NSW
Place of Enlistment BRISBANE, QLD
Next of Kin MILSON, JOYCE
Date of Discharge 12 Sep 1945
Rank Sergeant

Posting at Discharge 1 Wireless and Gunnery School
WW2 Honours and Gallantry None for display
Prisoner of War No  
Milson, Lancelot Manuel (I325)
 
18 Military Service

MILSON, NOEL LOUIS
Service Australian Army
Service Number NX29637
Date of Birth 15 Nov 1914
Place of Birth ARMIDALE, NSW
Date of Enlistment 10 Jun 1940
Locality on Enlistment ARMIDALE, NSW
Place of Enlistment PADDINGTON, NSW
Next of Kin MILSON, GEORGE
Date of Discharge 21 Sep 1945
Rank Gunner

Posting at Discharge 2/9 Field Regiment
WW2 Honours and Gallantry None for display
Prisoner of War No  
Milson, Noel Louis (I327)
 
19 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F103
 
20 Military Service

Number 6740
Rank Private
Unit 3 Infantry Battalion - 13 to 23 Reinforcements (December 1915 - November 1916)
Ship Name SS Port Nicholson
Date of embarkation 8 November 1916
Place of embarkation Sydney  
Dickinson, Harry Alleyne (I257)
 
21 MILSON, WILLIAM MICHAEL STANLEY
Service Australian Army
Service Number NX41384
Date of Birth 20 Jan 1904
Place of Birth BARRABA, NSW
Date of Enlistment 11 Sep 1940
Locality on Enlistment BARADINE, NSW
Place of Enlistment TAMWORTH, NSW
Next of Kin MILSON, PHILOMENA
Date of Discharge 21 Apr 1945
Rank Corporal
Posting at Discharge 5 AUST W/SHOP COY AEME
WW2 Honours and Gallantry None for display
Prisoner of War No  
Milson, William Michael Stanley (I113)
 
22 Milsons Point Brief History

Milsons Point is located near the northern end of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in Sydney's North Shore.Two Aboriginal groups, the Wallumedegal and the Cammeraygal inhabited the North Shore before the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788. The Wallumedegals lived near Milsons Point where they hunted, fished and canoed around the harbour. Most of the Qallumedegals died during a smallpox epidemic in 1789.

In 1806 James Milson was granted land in the area shortly after arriving to the colony from England. Milson built a cottage which he named the Milk House and set up a dairy cattle farm. He made his living by supplying the ships anchored in the harbour with milk and beef.

Access from the city to Milsons Point was first provided by watermen, paddle steamers and ferries and later in 1886 the first cable tramway was opened from Milsons Point to St Leonards Park in North Sydney. The first ferry service from the city to Milsons Point was run by harbour waterman, Billy Blue from 1817-1834. Billy Blue was a convict that was sent to the Colonies after stealing sugar.

Named after James Milson who acquired nine hectares of land near there in 1806. Apart from growing produce and quarring sandstone, he also ran a ferry service between Milsons Point and Bennelong Point. The Harbour Bridge was also fabricated in workshops near this site. He was keeper of Government House
In 1805, Robert Campbell purchased a large section of land on the waterfront of the North Shore, between Lavender Bay and Careening Bay, extending about 600 yards inland, which comprised Milsons Point and the future sites of Luna Park, North Sydney Olympic Pool, North Shore Railway Line and public recreational areas. ‘It was a block of 120 acres which had been originally granted to Robert Ryan, and had passed via Charles Grimes, the surveyor-general, to its new owner’. James Milson settled on this land in 1806 ‘where by the grace of Robert Campbell, he grazed his herd and built his house’. From 1822 onwards, Milson signed a lease for this land, paying 8 pounds per year but later disputed Campbell’s claim to it.

In 1825 he was granted 50 acres between Lavender Bay and Careening Cove. Between 1832 and his death in 1872, a number of substantial houses were built on his land for his family. Whilst most of these building have since been demolished or greatly modified, some remain and are important features of North Sydney’s cultural heritage. “Carabella Cottage” was built in 1828 for his daughter and her husband, William Shairp, at the head of Careening Cove. “Brisbane House” was built in 1831 for his second daughter Elizabeth, wife of R.T. Hall. “Wia Wia” was completed in 1834 for his son James. “Grantham” was built on the high ground as a residence for himself. Other houses associated with the family include “Elamang”, “Fern Lodge”, “Careena”, “The Hermitage” and a number of others in the vicinity.

By 1830, virtually all of the lands comprising the present Council area of North Sydney were held in six properties, with only the central North Sydney township and the point north of Careening Cove remaining as Crown land and some smaller properties in the Crows Nest area. Each property had a residence and some land cleared which grew vegetables and fruit and Milson occasionally ran cattle on the land, but generally the land was too poor for agriculture 
Milson, James (I382)
 
23 Occupation Clothier (Cloth Maker). Family F20
 
24 Occupation: Boot Maker Dickinson, Alfred (I9)
 
25 Occupation: Clothier


Baptism 22 Jun 1789 Name Martha Mary Dickinson Father John Mother Judith Occupation - Residence Morley Date of Birth 20 Jun 1789 Church or Chapel Morley Rehoboth Cong. Chapel, 1765-1838

.Baptism 1 Feb 1787 Name William Dickinson Father John Mother Judith Occupation clothier Residence Morley Date of Birth 28 Dec 1786 Church or Chapel Morley Rehoboth Cong. Chapel, 1765-1838

Baptism 23 Jan 1785 Name Betty Dickinson Father John Mother - Occupation - Residence Morley Date of Birth - Church or Chapel Morley Rehoboth Cong. Chapel, 1765-1838 
Dickinson, John (I69)
 
26 Occupation: London, England
"Cellarman" to a Wine Merchant, at the time of his Marriage.

Arrived New Zealand 10 JAN 1875 Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand On board the S.S. Rakaia 
Millson, George Henry (I192)
 
27 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F26
 
28 Phyllis was transported on the “Cornwall” in 1839. She arrived 1st September with 374 government immigrants, principally farm labourers and some mechanics. 18 infants died and 5 were born during the passage

Phyllis married John Davis when she was 14 years old

Place of Burial: Curlewis, NSW


A baby daughter was stolen by natives and never recovered, whilst Phyllis was midwifing at a nearby property 
Ashenden, Phyllis A S (I163)
 
29 Richard and Elizabeth were cousins. Richard's mother (Sarah Cripps) and Elizabeth's father (Thomas Cripps) were brother and sister.  Millson, Richard (I176)
 
30 Sarah Ward was tried at the Old Bailey on 9 Sep 1818 for feloniously disposing of and putting away, 'a certain forged and counterfeit bank note with intent to defraud the Governor and the Company of the Bank of England, she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited', and having been convicted was sentenced to death.

This sentence was later reduced to life transportation. She had five children at the time and was aged 27. Sarah and her five children were all transported aboard the 'Janus'.

Sarah arrived in New South Wales on 3 May 1820 aboard the 'Janus'. Of the 105 convicts who embarked, only one died during the voyage. The voyage formed the basis of an inquiry when it arrived. There were two Roman Catholic priests on board and they probably made complaint on their arrival about the prostitution which prevailed on board. The Janus, which really was a whaler, embarked her prisoners at Cork, and, running out to Rio in 64 days, completed the passage to Port Jackson in 148 days. Her master, Thomas J Mowat, had been ordered to call at Hobart, but when the surgeon-superintendent, James Creagh, died off the Tasmanian coast, Mowat chose to disregard his orders.

The magistrates reported that prostitution had prevailed 'in a great degree' throughout the voyage, and that charges that Mowat and the officers had not made due exertions to prevent it were 'true and well founded in fact'. [Source: 'The Convict Ships 1799-1868' by Charles Bateson.]

It would seem that sometime around 1822 Sarah's daughter Sarah, committed an offence for which she received a colonial sentence of transportation to Port Macquarie. The 1823-25 Muster records her and her children (but not Thomas) as living at Port Macquarie. 
Ward, Sarah (I93)
 
31 Service Record

Name DICKINSON, HARRY ALLEYN FRANCIS
Service Royal Australian Air Force
Service Number 411296
Date of Birth 21 Apr 1920
Place of Birth BURWOOD, NSW
Date of Enlistment 28 Apr 1941
Locality on Enlistment Unknown
Place of Enlistment SYDNEY, NSW
Next of Kin DICKINSON, HARRY
Date of Death 12 May 1943
Rank Flight Sergeant
Posting on Death 3 BOMB AND GUNNERY SCHOOL WEST SALE
WW2 Honours and Gallantry None for display
Prisoner of War No
Roll of Honour Unknown


Australian Flight Sergeant
Royal Australian Air Force
23
12/05/1943
411296
Son of Harry Alleyn Francis and Elizabeth Dickinson, of Bankstown, New South Wales.

Commonwealth War Dead
Panel 6. SYDNEY MEMORIAL  
Dickinson, Harry Alleyne Francis (I240)
 
32 THOROLD de Bukenhale (-after [1076/79]). Sheriff of Lincolnshire. The Annals of Peterborough record that “Thoroldus vicecomes et frater germanus Godivæ comitissæ Leycestriæ” founded Spalding Monastery in 1052.

“Thoroldus de Bukenhale…vicecomiti” donated Spalding monastery to Croyland abbey which names “domino meo Leofrico comite Leicestriæ et…comitissa sua domina Godiva sorore mea…et cognati mei comitis Algari primogeniti et hæredis eorum”. Herman´s De miraculis sancti Eadmundi names “…Lincolniensis Turoldus…” among those present when Herfast Bishop of Thetford visited Baldwin Abbot of St Edmund´s to be cured of an injury to his eye, dated to [1076/79] by Round. 
of Bukendale, Thorold (I1195)
 
33 William EVANS

Where Born : Llandovery , Carmarthenshire, Wales
Occupation : Labourer / Soldier
Date Arrived :25 October 1794
Ship Arrived on : "Surprise"
Rank on Discharge :
Date of Enlistment : 8 January 1793
Where Enlisted : Enlisted England Savoy Prisoner
Date of Transfer : 24 April 1810
Transfer : 73rd Regiment
Date of Discharge :
Where Discharged : Sydney
Died : 16 November 1811
Where Died / Buried : in Sydney / burial registered St Phillips Church 17 November 1811 C/D
Parents Names :
Spouse's Name : Judith Bidwell, convict, 
Evans, William (I4658)