Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
Discovering our American, Australian, British, Canadian and European Ancestors
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251
Hartley Courthouse
Hartley Courthouse
Hartley court house, built by Duncan Campbell 1837.
Susannah was charged with taking the stones 
 
252
Hastings Caot of Arms
Hastings Caot of Arms
John, Lord Hastings, died in February 1313. Sometime in 1318, Isabel Despenser married for the third time, to Ralph de Monthermer, who had made a secret marriage to Joan of Acre in 1297. He had been widowed since April 1307, and was also much older than Isabel, probably born in 1262. Letters of Edward II written before he became King reveal that he was on very good terms with Ralph; however, Ralph didn't play a big role in Edward's reign, though he fought for the King at Bannockburn, where he was captured (and released without ransom). Isabel and Ralph married without the necessary royal licence, for which they received a pardon on 12 August 1319. 
 
253
Hawise Le Strange
Hawise Le Strange
Replica of Lady Hawys seal, late 13th century.  
 
254
Helgarde De Ponthieu
Helgarde De Ponthieu
 
 
255
Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon, by Steven van Herwijck, c. 1561-63
Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon, by Steven van Herwijck, c. 1561-63
Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon KG (4 March 1526 – 23 July 1596), was an English nobleman and courtier. He was the patron of Lord Chamberlain's Men, William Shakespeare's playing company. The son of Mary Boleyn, the sister of Anne Boleyn, he was a cousin of Elizabeth I. Since his mother was also a mistress to King Henry VIII of England, some historians have speculated that he might have been an illegitimate child of Henry VIII.

 
 
256
Henry Dangar
Henry Dangar
The first white man to see the area around Aberdeen was probably the Assistant Surveyor Henry Dangar who passed Muscle Creek on his way to Dartbrook in 1824. Other explorers such as William Nowland and Allan Cunningham also passed through Aberdeen in the late 1820's seeking a new route North. 
 
257
Henry De Hastings
Henry De Hastings
Henry de Hastings (c. 1235 ? c. 1269) was created Baron in 1264 by Simon de Montfort. He led the Londoners at the Battle of Lewes, where he was taken prisoner, and fought at the Battle of Evesham. He resisted the King at Kenilworth, and, after the Dictum of Kenilworth he commanded the last remnants of the baronial party when they made their last stand in the Isle of Ely, submitting to Henry in July 1267.

Although he was known by the title of Baron, his baronial title was not recognised by the crown; hence his son John Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings is regarded and enumerated as the first baron of the line.  
 
258
Henry Kables Grave Windsor
Henry Kables Grave Windsor
On 18 March 1783, Kable was convicted of burglary at Thetford, Norfolk, England and sentenced to death. His sentence was commuted to transportation for fourteen years to the United States, however, the American Revolution made transportation to America impossible and Henry was returned to the Norwich Castle gaol.

At Norwich Castle gaol, Henry met and began a relationship with Susannah Holmes, who gave birth in prison to a son Henry. Holmes had been sentenced to death on 22 March 1784 after being found guilty of theft. Her sentence was also commuted and she was sentenced to transportation to the United States colonies for a term of 14 years.  
 
259
Henry of Grosmont, from the Bruges Garter Book (1430) by William Bruges
Henry of Grosmont, from the Bruges Garter Book (1430) by William Bruges
Grosmont's uncle, Thomas of Lancaster, was the son and heir of Edward I's brother Edmund Crouchback. Through his inheritance and a fortunate marriage, Thomas became the wealthiest peer in England, but constant quarrels with King Edward II led to his execution in 1322. Having no heir, Thomas's possessions and titles went to his younger brother Henry – Grosmont's father. Earl Henry of Lancaster assented to the deposition of Edward II in 1327, but did not long stay in favour with the regency of Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer. When Edward III took personal control of the government in 1330, relations with the Crown got better, but by this time the older Henry was already struggling with poor health and blindness. 
 
260
Henry Richard Milson
Henry Richard Milson
 
 
261
At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
 
 
262
Herbert Hennery Millson
Herbert Hennery Millson
 
 
263
Herbert Henry Milson
Herbert Henry Milson
 
 
264
Hesdin Coat of Arms
Hesdin Coat of Arms
 
 
265
Hesilia Crispin Coat of Arms
Hesilia Crispin Coat of Arms
 
 
266
Hody of Pilsdon Coat of Arms
Hody of Pilsdon Coat of Arms
He was a Member of Parliament for Totnes in 1472, and for Bridgwater in 1483. His name is first mentioned in the year-books in 1476. He procured a reversal of the attainder of his uncle, Sir Alexander Hody of Bowre, Somerset, who had been attainted at Edward IV's accession for adherence to the House of Lancaster during the wars of the Roses.[4] In 1485, shortly after the accession of King Henry VII, Hody became Attorney General for England and Wales. On 29 October 1486 he was appointed Chief Baron of the Exchequer. He retired as a judge in 1522. 
 
267
Holleway Coat of Arms
Holleway Coat of Arms
Holleway Arms of Holleway (alias Holway) of Holway: Gules, a fesse between three crescents argent 
 
268
Horsford Castle
Horsford Castle
Horsford Castle, near to Horsford, Norfolk, Great Britain. A view of the 11th century motte and bailey castle. Consisting of a deep ditch, large bailey and low motte. Founded by Robert Malet or possibly his tenant Walter of Caen. After the main use of defence became less important the castle probably became a hunting lodge. Abandoned after 1431, the bailey was ploughed in the 1980s.  
 
269
Hugh 'The Great' Capet
Hugh "The Great" Capet
 
 
270
Hugh De Grandmesnil
Hugh De Grandmesnil
 
 
271
Hugh De Grandmesnil
Hugh De Grandmesnil
Hugh de Grandmesnil was a Domesday tenant and a Companion of William the Conqueror. He accompanied Duke William to England where he was most certainly present at the Battle of Hastings.

He was banished from Normandy by duke William in 1058 for very little cause, but was pardoned in 1063, at which time he was given the custody of the castle of Neufmarché-en-Lions. In 1067 he was one of those who, with William Fitz Osberne and Bishop Odo, were invested with the government of England during the king’s absence. Hugh received 100 manors, mostly in Leicester, of which county he was sheriff. He was one of the Normans who interceded with king William on behalf of his son, Robert Curthose 
 
272
Hugh De Grandmesnil Coat of Arms
Hugh De Grandmesnil Coat of Arms
Hugh De Grandmesnil Coat of Arms 
 
273
Hugh De Grandmesnil1.
Hugh De Grandmesnil1.
 
 
274
Hugh Despenser the younger, from a manuscript of Jean Froissart.
Hugh Despenser the younger, from a manuscript of Jean Froissart.
Hugh Despenser the younger became royal chamberlain in 1318. As a royal courtier, Despenser manoeuvred into the affections of King Edward, displacing the previous favourite, Roger d'Amory. This was much to the dismay of the baronage as they saw him both taking their rightful places at court and being a worse version of Gaveston. By 1320 his greed was running free. Despenser seized the Welsh lands of his wife's inheritance, ignoring the claims of his two brothers-in-law. He forced Alice de Lacy, Countess of Lincoln, to give up her lands, cheated his sister-in-law Elizabeth de Clare out of Gower and Usk, and allegedly had Lady Baret's arms and legs broken until she went insane.  
 
275
Hugh Rethel Coat of Arms
Hugh Rethel Coat of Arms
Hugh I, Count of Rethel (1040 in Bourg – 1118 in Rethel) was a son of Count Manasses III of Rethel and his wife Judith of Roucy. He succeeded his father in 1065 as Count of Rethel.  
 
276
Hugh VIII the Old of Lusignan
Hugh VIII the Old of Lusignan
Hugh VIII the Old of Lusignan or Hugh III of La Marche (French: Hugues le Vieux) was the eldest son of Hugh VII and of Sarrasine or Saracena de Lezay. He became Seigneur de Lusignan, Couhé, and Château-Larcher and Count of La Marche on his father's death in 1151. Born in Poitou, 1106–1110 or some time after 1125, he died in the Holy Land in 1165 or 1171.

He married in 1140/1141 Bourgogne or Burgondie de Rancon, Dame de Fontenay, daughter of Geoffroi or Geoffroy de Rancon, Seigneur de Taillebourg and wife Fossefie (Falsifie), Dame de Moncontour, by whom he also became Seigneur de Fontenay: she died on April 11, 1169. In 1163 or 1164 he went on pilgrimage and on crusade to the Holy Land and participated in the Battle of Harim, where he was taken prisoner. 
 
277
Hughes De Lusignan
Hughes De Lusignan
 
 
278
Hugues le Brun
Hugues le Brun
 
 
279
Humphrey 'with the Beard' De Bohun Coat of Arms
Humphrey "with the Beard" De Bohun Coat of Arms
Humphrey with the Beard (died before 1113) was a Norman soldier and nobleman, the earliest known ancestor of the de Bohun family, later prominent in England as Earls of Hereford and Earls of Essex. He took part in the Norman Conquest of England of 1066 although not one of the 15 or so proven Companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings. 
 
280
Humphrey Stafford 1st Duke of Buckingham
Humphrey Stafford 1st Duke of Buckingham
Born in 1402, Stafford was only a year old when his father's early death in the battle of Shrewsbury made him Earl of Stafford. He served in France in 1420-1, and was knighted by Henry V in the latter year. In December 1422 he received livery of his lands.2 Young as he was, Stafford appears in the council of Henry VI as early as February 1424, and became one of its more prominent members. He had a hand in reconciling Beaufort and Humphrey of Gloucester in 1426 
 
281
Isabel De Vermandois
Isabel De Vermandois
 
 
282
Isabell Neville
Isabell Neville
Isabel Neville was born at Warwick Castle, the seat of the Earls of Warwick. In 1469, her ambitious father betrothed her to England's heir presumptive, George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence, the brother of both King Edward IV and Richard, Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III). The king opposed the marriage as it would bring the already powerful Earl of Warwick too close to the throne. The ceremony however took place in secret at Calais on 11 July 1469, conducted by Isabel Neville's Uncle George Neville, archbishop of York.  
 
283
Isabella Davis
Isabella Davis
 
 
284
Isabella Davis
Isabella Davis
 
 
285
Jacob Ashenden
Jacob Ashenden
 
 
286
James Blackman
James Blackman
 
 
287
James Blackman
James Blackman
 
 
288
James Milson
James Milson
 
 
289
James Milson
James Milson
 
 
290
Janet Brownlie
Janet Brownlie
 
 
291
Jessie Samuel Millson
Jessie Samuel Millson
 
 
292
Jessie Samuel MILSON
Jessie Samuel MILSON
 
 
293
Jim and Elaine Milson
Jim and Elaine Milson
 
 
294
Joan Plantagenet
Joan Plantagenet
 
 
295
Joan Plantagenet
Joan Plantagenet
 
 
296
Joan Plantagenet of Kent
Joan Plantagenet of Kent
Joan of Kent (29 September 1328–7 August 1385), known to history as The Fair Maid of Kent, was the mother of King Richard II of England, whom she bore to her third husband Edward, the Black Prince, son and heir of King Edward III.

Although the French chronicler Jean Froissart called her "the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England, and the most loving", the appellation "Fair Maid of Kent" does not appear to be contemporary. Joan assumed the title of fourth Countess of Kent and fifth Baroness Wake of Liddell after the death of her brother, John, in 1352.

 
 
297
Joan Plantagenet of Kent
Joan Plantagenet of Kent
 
 
298
John Davis
John Davis
 
 
299
John Davis
John Davis

This photo was taken of Jack after he was held up by Ben Hall near Tamworth

Robyn Blackwood on 30th October, 2015 wrote:

John served his sentence and married Phyllis Ashenden (transported on the “Cornwall” in 1839) on 31 Oct 1842 at Scone, N.S.W. They had 16 children, 7 sons and 9 daughters (a baby daughter was stolen by natives and never recovered, whilst Phyllis was midwifing at a nearby property). John died at Stoney Batter, Kingstown located half way between Uralla and Bundarra in the New England area of New South Wales. 
 
300
John Davis Kitchen
John Davis Kitchen
 
 

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