Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
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Kings


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1

Henry IV (15 April 1367– 20 March 1413), also known as Henry Bolingbroke, was King of England and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413, and asserted the claim of his grandfather, Edward III, to the Kingdom of France.

Henry was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire. His father, John of Gaunt, was the fourth son of Edward III and the third son to survive to adulthood, and enjoyed a position of considerable influence during much of the reign of Henry's cousin Richard II, whom Henry eventually deposed.

Henry's mother was Blanche, heiress to the considerable Lancaster estates, and thus he became the first King of England from the Lancaster branch of the Plantagenets and the first King of England since the Norman Conquest whose mother tongue was English rather than French. 
 
2

Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor.

Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey. During Mary's reign, Elizabeth was imprisoned for nearly a year on suspicion of supporting Protestant rebels. 
 
3
Christine De Pisan and Queen Isabeau
Christine De Pisan and Queen Isabeau
Isabeau of Bavaria (or Isabelle; also Elisabeth of Bavaria-Ingolstadt; c. 1370 – 24 September 1435) was born into the House of Wittelsbach as the eldest daughter of Duke Stephen III of Bavaria-Ingolstadt and Taddea Visconti of Milan. She became Queen of France when she married King Charles VI in 1385. At age 15 or 16, Isabeau was sent to France on approval to the young French king; the couple wed three days after their first meeting. 
 
4
Edward II shown receiving the English crown
Edward II shown receiving the English crown
 
 
5
Edward III, detail from his bronze effigy in Westminster Abbey
Edward III, detail from his bronze effigy in Westminster Abbey
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of fifty years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. 
 
6
Guildford Dudley
Guildford Dudley
Jane and Lord Guilford Dudley were both charged with high treason, together with two of Dudley's brothers. Their trial, by a special commission, took place on 13 November 1553, at the Guildhall in the City of London. The commission was chaired by Sir Thomas White, Lord Mayor of London, and included Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby and John Bourchier, 2nd Earl of Bath. Both defendants were found guilty and sentenced to death. Jane's sentence was that she "be burned alive [the traditional English punishment for treason committed by women] on Tower Hill or beheaded as the Queen pleases." However, the imperial ambassador reported to Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, that her life was to be spared. 
 
7
House of Lancaster
House of Lancaster
 
 
8
King Charles VI of France
King Charles VI of France
Charles VI (3 December 1368 – 21 October 1422), called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) and the Mad (French: le Fol or le Fou), was King of France for 42 years from 1380 to his death in 1422. He was a member of the House of Valois.

Charles VI was only 11 when he inherited the throne in the midst of the Hundred Years' War. The government was entrusted to his four uncles, the dukes of Burgundy, Berry, Anjou, and Bourbon. Although the royal age of majority was fixed at 14, the dukes maintained their grip on Charles until he took power at the age of 21. During the rule of his uncles, the financial resources of the kingdom, painstakingly built up by his father, Charles V, were squandered for the personal profit of the dukes, whose interests were frequently divergent or even opposed. As royal funds drained, new taxes had to be raised, which caused several revolts. 
 
9
King Henry 'Curtmantle' II and Eleanor of Aquitaine
King Henry "Curtmantle" II and Eleanor of Aquitaine
Reigned 1154-1189. He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. 
 
10
King Henry III England
King Henry III England
 
 
11
King Henry V Plantagenet
King Henry V Plantagenet
In his youth, Henry gained military experience fighting the Welsh during the revolt of Owain Glyndwr and against the powerful aristocratic House of Percy of Northumberland at the Battle of Shrewsbury. Henry later came into political conflict with his father, Henry IV, whose health was increasingly precarious from 1405 onward and who had consequently started to withdraw from government functions. After his father's death in 1413, Henry assumed control of the country and asserted the pending English claims to the French throne. 
 
12
King John I Lackland
King John I Lackland
 
 
13
Margaret De Audley painting
Margaret De Audley painting
Daughter of Thomas Audley, 1st baron Audley of Walden, and Elizabeth Grey; Margaret and her sister Mary remained co-heirs, until Mary herself died under age and unmarried. Margaret inherited lands worth £1000 per annum, including Cree Church Place in London and Audley End on the outskirts of Saffron Walden.

One of the wealthiest young women in England when she was married at thirteen to Henry Dudley, the son of John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland. Her lands were confiscated when Northumberland was found guilty of treason and executed. Henry Dudley was restored in blood on 5 Jul 1556 and subsequently began proceedings with his wife in chancery to gain possession of land in Hertfordshire, claimed by Thomas Castell, Esq., of London. 
 
14
Mary de Bohun and Henry Bolingbroke
Mary de Bohun and Henry Bolingbroke
Mary was the daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford, and Joan FitzAlan (1347/48–1419), the daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, and Eleanor of Lancaster. Through her mother, Mary was descended from Llywelyn the Great.
 
 
15
Queen Jane Grey
Queen Jane Grey
Jane, Queen of England and Ireland (1536/1537 – 12 February 1554), more commonly known as Lady Jane Grey, was a claimant to the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Ireland, who was de facto monarch of England for just over a week in 1553.

Executed on 12 February 1554, Lady Jane Grey's claimed rule of less than two weeks in July 1553 is the shortest rule of England in the history of the country. Popular history sometimes refers to Lady Jane as "The Nine Days' Queen" or, less commonly, as "The nine Day Queen" owing to disagreements about the beginning of her claimed rule. Historians have taken either the day of her official proclamation as Queen (10 July) or that of her predecessor's death (6 July) as the beginning.