Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
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Whether your name be Dickinson, Dickenson, Dickerson or Dickonson, I bring you greetings to-day from our common ancestors, among whose blessed shades I have been wandering for the past few months. 
 
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Talbot was already a knight when, on 26 July 1444, he was created Lord and Baron Lisle of Kingston Lisle in Berkshire by Henry VI,[1] his mother being one of the co-heirs to the previous creation of the barony. He stood to inherit much of her estates in Wales on the Welsh Marches, and in Gloucestershire at Painswick. She had fought long and hard to enfranchise her son for the duration of the Berkeley feud, in which the young nobleman's manor house was raided by Lord Berkeley's brothers. After 1449, his mother was one of three co-heiresses to her father, and through her he possessed a claim on Berkeley Castle. In 1451, already a veteran of the fight at St Barnets Green,[clarification needed] he was created Viscount Lisle.  
 
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Danby bears for Arms:—Argent, three Chevronels interlaced in bate, sable; on a chief of the second, three Mullets, of the first.

Crest:—A crab proper.

Sir Christopher Danby, her husband, was son of Sir James, and grandson of Sir Robert Danby, of Thorpe Perrow, Knt., Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench, who died 11 Edw. IV. (1472), and who was one of the younger sons of Thomas Danby, of Danby. super-wiske, by Mary, daughter of Sir Robert Tanfield, Knt. This Thomas Danby, was the ninth in lineal descent, from Roger Stringent, otherwise Danby, Lord of Danby-super-wiske, in the time of the Conqueror. The first of the family mentioned in the Pedigree, is Edward Stringent, a soldier of fortune, who came over with William, who gave him for wife Armatrude, daughter of John, Lord of Great, and Little Danby. 
 
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17th century representation of Lambert I and Gerberga
17th century representation of Lambert I and Gerberga
Counts of Leuven

In 959 the East Frankish king Otto I of Germany elevated Count Godfrey of Jülich to the rank of duke of Lower Lorraine. In 962 the duchy became an integral part of the Holy Roman Empire, where Godfrey's successors of the ducal Ardennes-Verdun dynasty also ruled over the Gau of Brabant. Here the Counts of Leuven rose to power, when about 1000 Count Lambert I the Bearded married Gerberga, the daughter of Duke Charles of Lower Lorraine, and acquired the County of Brussels. About 1024 southernmost Brabant fell to Count Reginar V of Mons (Bergen, later Hainaut), and Imperial lands up to the Schelde river in the west came under the rule of the French Counts Baldwin V of Flanders by 1059. Upon the death of Count Palatine Herman II of Lotharingia in 1085, Emperor Henry IV assigned his fief between the Dender and Zenne rivers as the Landgraviate of Brabant to Count Henry III of Leuven and Brussels. 
 
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Adam De Swillington - Wades Mill Thundridge
Adam De Swillington - Wades Mill Thundridge
Thundridge

Before the Conquest the manor of THUNDRIDGE, sometimes called WADESMILL, was held by Alnod under Stigand, Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1086 it formed part of the possessions of Odo Bishop of Bayeux, of whom it was held by Hugh de Grentmesnil. It was assessed at 1 hide only. There was land for four ploughs, but there were only three on the manor, one of which was on the demesne; there was meadow for four plough-teams, woodland for sixteen swine, and a mill (fn. 9) (possibly on the site of Wadesmill). After the forfeiture of the Bishop of Bayeux the manor was held of the king in chief by the successors of Grentmesnil, and this tenancy follows the descent of the manor of Ware (q.v.). 
 
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Adeliza De Toeni
Adeliza De Toeni
 
 
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Arms of Owen Tudor
Arms of Owen Tudor
Sir Owen Tudor (Welsh: Owain ap Maredudd ap Tudur, c. 1400 – 2 February 1461) was a Welsh courtier and the second husband of Catherine of Valois (1401–1437), Henry V's widow. He was the grandfather of Henry VII, founder of the Tudor dynasty. Owen was a descendant of a prominent family from Penmynydd on the Isle of Anglesey, which traces its lineage back to Ednyfed Fychan (d. 1246), a Welsh official and seneschal to the Kingdom of Gwynedd. Tudor's grandfather, Tudur ap Goronwy, married Margaret, daughter of Thomas ap Llywelyn ab Owain of Cardiganshire, the last male of the princely house of Deheubarth. Margaret's elder sister married Gruffudd Fychan of Glyndyfrdwy, whose son was Owain Glyndwr. Owen's father, Maredudd ap Tudur, and his uncles were prominent in Owain Glyndwr's revolt against English rule, the Glyndwr Rising.  
 
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Arms of Sir Henry Fitz Hugh, 3rd Baron Fitz Hugh
Arms of Sir Henry Fitz Hugh, 3rd Baron Fitz Hugh
Summoned to parliament in 1388, Fitz Hugh became active in public affairs following Henry IV's succession. He was engaged in Anglo-Scottish diplomacy, taking part in the Battle of Humbleton Hill in 1402 and negotiating the surrender of his uncle, Archbishop of York Richard le Scrope, in 1405. The next year he travelled to Denmark as part of the escort of Philippa, Henry's daughter, for her marriage to Eric of Pomerania, king of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. 
 
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Arnulf I, Count of Flanders
Arnulf I, Count of Flanders
Arnulf of Flanders (c. 890 – March 28, 965), called the Great, was the third Count of Flanders, who ruled the County of Flanders, an area that is now northwestern Belgium and southwestern Netherlands.


 
 
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Baldwin IV Count of Flanders from 987
Baldwin IV Count of Flanders from 987
Baldwin IV, born c. 980, was the son of Arnulf II, Count of Flanders (c. 961 - 987) and Rozala of Lombardy (950/60 – 1003), of the House of Ivrea. He succeeded his father as Count of Flanders in 987, but with his mother Rozala as the regent until his majority. 
 
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Baldwin V Flanders
Baldwin V Flanders
In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death. 
 
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Ballymote Castle
Ballymote Castle
Richard Óg was the most powerful of the de Burgh Earls of Ulster, succeeding his father in Ulster and Connacht upon reaching his majority in 1280. He was a friend of King Edward I of England, and ranked first among the Earls of Ireland. Richard married Margaret, the daughter of his cousin John de Borough and Cecily Baillol. He pursued expansionist policies that often left him at odds with fellow Norman lords. 
 
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Baynard Castle Cottingham
Baynard Castle Cottingham
Baynard Castle, Cottingham (sketch) was a moated castle built in the 12th and 13th centuries in the village of Cottingham, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It was referred to by terms including the 'castle at Cottingham' or 'Stuteville's castle'. References to a manor house at the castle site in Cottingham date to as early as the 1170s; in 1200 William de Stuteville entertained King John I in Cottingham, receiving permission for a market and to strengthen the castle at Cottingham; in 1201 a licence to fortify was issued to enclose and fortify the site. By 1272 a moat had been built and a boundary wall and double ditch were noted in 1282. --- The male line of the de Stutevilles ended in 1233, and the castle was acquired by the le Wake family, then. 
 
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Belvoir Castle
Belvoir Castle
Belvoir Castle is a stately home in the English county of Leicestershire, overlooking the Vale of Belvoir 
 
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Belvoir Castle
Belvoir Castle
From this marriage came the Breton Lords of Belvoir, the Earls and Dukes of Rutland, and also the Lords of Daubeney of South Petherton and the Earls of Bridgwater'. Robert's other grand-daughter, Cecily's sister Maud, married William d'Aubigny (now St. Martin d'Aubigny) known as Pincerna, distinguishing him from his sister-in-law's husband Brito; the issue of this marriage became the Albini or Aubigny Earls of Arundel & Sussex'. 
 
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Bigod Modern Coat of Arms
Bigod Modern Coat of Arms
The first of this great family that settled in England, in the Conqueror's time, possessed six lordships in Essex and a hundred and seventeen in Suffolk, besides divers manors in Norfolk. Roger Bigod was one of the tight-knit group of second-rank Norman nobles who did well out of the conquest of England. His territorial fortune was based on his service in the royal household, where he was a close adviser and agent for the first three Norman kings, and the propitius circumstances of post-Conquest politics.  
 
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Bradley Hall
Bradley Hall
Bradley Hall was owned by the Richard Dickinson family of Staffordshire, England, from 1526 until 1547, with his wife Elizabeth Bagnell. 
 
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Butler Family History
Butler Family History
Whether his mother was Walter de Caen's daughter or Thomas Becket's aunt or someone else, Hervey, his father was succeeded by his son Hervey Walter, whose marriage was of considerable consequence to the family that was taking root. For his wife was Maud de Valognes, sister in law of Ranulph de Glanville, the most powerful of all Henry II's subjects; and Ranulph, who took an avuncular interest in the upbringing of Maud's children, so advanced them that even by the end of the 12th century the family tree was no mean sapling. 
 
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Butler Family History
Butler Family History
It is from acorns that great oak trees grow. So let us begin by looking at the seedling of the Butler family tree. It will be found in 12th century England. The paternal ancestry of the family is traceable in unbroken succession to a certain Hervey who was living about 1130. From the "Testa de Nevil", which was compiled a century later, we know Hervey had a son, Hervey Walter (which suggests a maternal connection with someone by the name of Walter) and a daughter Alice, to whom her father gave a dowry of about 400 acres in Lancashire. Harvey seems also to have had various estates in East Anglia. But the identity of his father, mother or wife has not yet been established. It has been suggested in "The Complete Peerage" that he may have married an aunt of Thomas Becket, with whose family the Butlers were reputedly connected.
 
 
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Caen coat of arms
Caen coat of arms
The Domesday book states that Walter de Caen was Lord of Sibton, given to him by Robert Malet's mother (William Malet's widow).

The giving of Sibton to Walter de Caen by William Malet's widow implies some relationship, possibly brother (but most likely bastard son--see below). See Domesday Book for history of Sibton. 
 
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Carey Coat of Arms
Carey Coat of Arms
Adam de Kari first appears in the “Heralds Visitation of Devon of 1620” there being no mention of him in earlier visitations. A much later visitation then states that Adam was lord of Castle Cary in 1198. Although useful the visitations must be treated with some caution as the information was often supplied by the families in question so it is unclear how reliable this might be. The then head of the family was Sir William Cary and in referring to Adam de Kari he was going back up to twelve generations and four hundred years. Concerning Castle Cary the pedigree explicitly places it in Devon thus; “Sir John Cary…had landes in three sundrie shires, Devon, Dorset and Somerset…at Hoke in Dorset, at Castle Cary in Devon.” 
 
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Catherine Howard
Catherine Howard
Catherine Howard (c.?1523 – 13 February 1542) was Queen of England from 1540 until 1541, as the fifth wife of Henry VIII. She (then aged 16 or 17) married him (then 49) on 28 July 1540, at Oatlands Palace, in Surrey, almost immediately after the annulment of his marriage to Anne of Cleves was arranged.

Catherine was stripped of her title as queen within 16 months, in November 1541. She was beheaded three months later, on the grounds of treason for committing adultery while married to Henry, similarly to Anne Boleyn.  
 
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Coat of Arms of Powys Wenwynwyn and successive De La Pole dynasty
Coat of Arms of Powys Wenwynwyn and successive De La Pole dynasty
 
 
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Coat of arms, Robert De Roos, Lord of Hamlake Castle
Coat of arms, Robert De Roos, Lord of Hamlake Castle
 
 
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Colville Coat of Arms
Colville Coat of Arms
The Clan Colville chiefs are of ancient Norman origin. The name is probably derived from the town of Colville in Normandy. The first of the name to appear in Scotland was Philip de Colville who is found as a witness to a charter to Dunfermline Monastery some time before 1159. In 1174 Phillip de Colville was one of the hostages used for the release of William the Lion under the Treaty of Falaise.  
 
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Cottons of Landwade House
Cottons of Landwade House
The manor was presumably retained in demesne by the Vere family between the late 11th century and the late 12th, but was granted by Earl Aubrey (d. 1194) to his constable, Robert son of William, for the service of 1 knight's fee. Robert was possibly related to Ralph of Hastings, who held a royal estate in Fordham c. 1155-60. Landwade manor was held of the Veres by the Hastings family until the late 14th century. In 1236 Sir Robert of Hastings, perhaps descended from the constable, held 2 hides for 1 knight's fee. In 1259 Sir Robert, reserving to himself a large income in corn and continued occupation of the manor house, settled the manor on his daughter Agnes, who then married Sir Philip of Pitsford (Northants.). Philip and Agnes bought back property there, including the manor's two mills, given by Robert to his probably illegitimate son Ellis and other relations. Sir Philip (fl. to 1271) died before Agnes, who held Landwade manor c. 1279-85 for a knight's fee. On her death it passed to her son Sir Robert, who took her surname of Hastings and held Landwade c. 1302-6. By 1316 it had descended to his son John de Hastings, who in 1339 entailed two thirds of it on the first marriage of his son and heir John. John the father was living in 1349. His son may have been lord in 1353. That son John Hastings, still alive in 1367, left no sons. In 1360-1 he had settled the manor on his second marriage to Elizabeth Sibill.  
 
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De Ferrers Coat of Arms
De Ferrers Coat of Arms
Henry de Ferrers (also known as Henri de Ferrières) was a Norman soldier from a noble family who took part in the conquest of England and is believed to have fought at the Battle of Hastings of 1066 and, in consequence, was rewarded with much land in the subdued nation.

His elder brother William fell in the battle. William and Henri were both sons of Walkeline de Ferrers (d.c. 1040) Seigneur of Ferrières-Saint-Hilaire, Eure in upper Normandy. The Ferrers family holding at Ferrières-Saint-Hilaire was the caput of their large Norman barony. 
 
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De La Pole
De La Pole
The family of Pole had been settled, for many years, at Ravenspun, so-called from its being the spot on which the Danes first landed in England, near the mouth of the Humber and planted their "Standard of the Raven" the emblem of Odin, on a spur of the Hill overlooking the river and sea. The real founder of the family, however, was I. William de la Pole, the elder 
 
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De La Pole Coat of Arms
De La Pole Coat of Arms
The family of Pole had been settled, for many years, at Ravenspun, so-called from its being the spot on which the Danes first landed in England, near the mouth of the Humber. and planted their "Standard of the Raven." the emblem of Odin, on a spur of the Hill overlooking the river and sea.  
 
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De Lacy Coat of Arms
De Lacy Coat of Arms
 
 
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De Ros
De Ros
They derived their name from the parish of Ros, now Rots, two miles from Caen, where they held a fief, but not the entire domain, which pertained to the De Patrys and others. The family must have been numerous at the time of the Conquest, and the formation of Domesday Book, as five of the name are there inscribed. They had evidently all followed Duke William to England, but did not stand high in his favour, for, with the exception of William, to whom he gave the Abbey of Fecamp, they do not figure among the tenants in chief either in 1086 or during the reign of William Rufus. All our researches have failed to determine the exact relationship of these five contemporaries, or indeed of a sixth, inscribed in 1090 on the roll of the Abbey of St. Stephen-of-Caen as William Gonnor de Ros. Nor have we been more fortunate in discovering which among them or their descendants was the father of Richard de Ros, who witnessed the foundation charter of Aunay Abbey in 1131 ; or of the trouvere Adam de Ros, author of the Descente de S. Paul aux Enfers. The history of this family is all the more obscure, as it appears to have become extinct towards the latter end of the fourteenth century.  
 
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De Stuteville Coat of Arms
De Stuteville Coat of Arms
'DE STUTEVILLE' family descended from the family 'd'Estouteville', who were a great seigneurial family based at Vallemont in the Caux district of eastern Normandy. The family claimed descent from a legendary Viking ancestor, Stoot (or Estout) the Dane.

Several branches of the family though, both in Nomandy and England, descended from ROBERT I. D'ESTOUTEVILLE , who was one of the knights accompanying William the Conqueror in the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and became ensued Baron of Cottingham, Yorkshire. His several sons by his second, Saxon, wife, produced the English Stuteville families. He was succeeded there by his son, also named Robert, who added to his inheritance the lordship of Schypwic, in the same county, by marriage with Eneburga, a Saxon heiress.  
 
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De Vere Coat of Arms
De Vere Coat of Arms
 
 
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Dickinson Coat of Arms
Dickinson Coat of Arms
The history of the Dickinson Coat of Arms goes back to the London Heraldry Office. This particular arms was given to the Dickinsons of Bradley Hall. It is thought that it was first petitioned in 1565, by Richard Dickinson of Bradley Hall. His application was, at this time rejected for the reason that only he and his father, William Dickinson used the arms.

In 1614, Edward Dickinson, the grandson of Richard Dickinson, made a second application for the arms and was granted it. Richard had proved four generations that used this arms:  
 
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Earls of Arundel
Earls of Arundel
Richard Fitz Alan, 4th or 11th Earl of Arundel and 9th Earl of Surrey, KG (1346 – 21 September 1397) was an English medieval nobleman and military commander. Born in 1346, he was the son of Richard Fitz Alan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster. He succeeded his father to the title of Earl of Arundel on 24 January 1376.

His brother was Thomas Arundel, the Bishop of Ely from 1374 to 1388, Archbishop of York from 1388 to 1397, and Archbishop of Canterbury in 1397 and from 1399 until his death in 1414.

At the coronation of Richard II, Richard Fitz Alan carried the crown. 
 
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Early 20th-century illustration of Bohun and Bigod confronting King Edward
Early 20th-century illustration of Bohun and Bigod confronting King Edward
Hereford's final years were marked by the opposition he and Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, mounted against the military and fiscal policy of Edward I. The conflict escalated to a point where civil war threatened, but was resolved when the war effort turned towards Scotland. The king signed the Confirmatio Cartarum – a confirmation of Magna Carta – and Bohun and Bigod agreed to serve on the Falkirk Campaign.  
 
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Edmund beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset
Edmund beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset
He held his first command in France in 1431, and nine years later he succeeded in recapturing Harfleur, the loss of which had shaken the English ascendancy in Normandy. He was at once invested with the garter on the scene of his triumph. In 1442 he obtained the earldom of Dorset for having relieved Calais, and on his return home after a successful expedition into Anjou in conjunction with his future antagonist the Duke of York, he was raised to a marquisate. But on succeeding his brother in the Somerset titles (to the earldom in 1444 and the dukedom in 1448), though he gained in political influence, military success deserted him. 
 
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Edmund De Lambert and Calverley
Edmund De Lambert and Calverley
An Historical, Topographical, and Descriptive View of the County of ...
By Eneas Mackenzie 
 
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Edmund Dickinson
Edmund Dickinson
Physica vetus et vera, sive Tractatus de naturali veritate hexaemeri mosaici, 1703

Dr. Dickinson was an intimate friend of the great French chemist Theodore Mundamus. He wrote several medical and scientific works, in one of which he undertook to prove that the Greeks borrowed their idea of the Oracle of Appollo at Delphi from the writings of Moses He married Elizabeth Luddington 
 
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Ednyfed Fychan ap Cynwrig
Ednyfed Fychan ap Cynwrig
Ednyfed Fychan (c. 1170 – 1246), full name Ednyfed Fychan ap Cynwrig, was a Welsh warrior who became seneschal to the Kingdom of Gwynedd in Northern Wales, serving Llywelyn the Great and his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn. He was a descendant (9th in descent) of Marchudd ap Cynan, Lord of Rhos, Lord Protector of Rhodri Mawr, King of Gwynedd and an ancestor of Owen Tudor and thereby of the Tudor dynasty, and all its royal successors down to the present day. 
 
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Effigy of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, Staindrop Church
Effigy of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, Staindrop Church
Ralph Neville was born about 1364, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, and The Hon Maud Percy (d. before 18 February 1379), daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick, Northumberland, by Idoine de Clifford, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford. Neville had a younger brother, and five sisters: 
 
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Elaine, Janice, Frank, Sid
Elaine, Janice, Frank, Sid
Elaine, Janice, Frank and Sid Dickinson 
 
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Eleanor's effigy at Fontevraud Abbey
Eleanor's effigy at Fontevraud Abbey
 
 
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Elizabeth De Clare
Elizabeth De Clare
Elizabeth de Clare, 11th Lady of Clare (16 September 1295 – 4 November 1360) was the heiress to the lordships of Clare, Suffolk, in England and Usk in Wales. She was the youngest of the three daughters of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford and Joan of Acre, and sister of Gilbert de Clare, who later succeeded as the 7th Earl. She is often referred to as Elizabeth de Burgh, due to her first marriage to John de Burgh. Her two successive husbands were Theobald II de Verdun (of the Butler family) and Roger d'Amory. 
 
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Estouteville Coat of Arms
Estouteville Coat of Arms
The "Sire d'Estoteville" of the Roman de Rou (l. 13,561) was in all probability Robert, surnamed Fronteboeuf, Granteboef, or, according to the French antiquaries, Grand-bois; but whether he was of Estouteville-sur-Cailly or Estouteville-sur-Mer may be an open question. There was a knightly family deriving their name from the former (at present a commune in the canton of Bouchy, arrondissement de Rouen), one of whom, Nicholas d'Estouteville, the great-great-grandson of Robert, married Gunnor or Gunnora, daughter of Hugh IV de Gournay, and widow of Robert de Gant, in the 12th century, and received with her in dower the manors of Beddingfield and Kimberly in Norfolk, which remained for many generations in the family of Stuteville, as it is called in England. This Estouteville was formerly a mouvance, i.e, a dependency on the fief of La Ferté en-Brai, of which the Gournays were the lords, and it is therefore likely that Robert d'Estouteville followed Hugh II de Gournay to England in the invading army. 
 
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Farnley Hall
Farnley Hall
Farnley Hall is a stately home in Farnley, west Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It is a grade II listed building. It was built in Elizabethan times by the Danbys. The manor is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Fernelei, so it is probable that this house was a replacement for earlier medieval structures. 
 
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Ferrer's Manor, West Rudham, Norfolk
Ferrer's Manor, West Rudham, Norfolk
This lordship was in the family of de Caineto, or Cheney, and came by the marriage of Margaret, daughter and heir of William Cheney, son of Ralph de Caineto, to Hugh de Cressi, a Norman, in the reign of Henry II. whose son, Roger de Cressi, married Isabel, daughter and coheir of of Hubert de Rie, and widow of Jeff. de Chester. This Roger being with the barons, in arms against King John, his lands were seized, and given to Robert de Ferrers; and Henry de Ferrers was found to hold the fourth part of a fee in the reign of Henry the II. Sir Guy de Ferrariis was living in the 15th of Edward I. as was Edmund de Ferrers, of West-Rudham, in the 31st of the said reign, and John de Ferrers in the reign of Edward II. and one of the same name occurs in the 20th of Edward III.  
 
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Fleming Coat of Arms
Fleming Coat of Arms
There were so many Flemings of Knightly degree settled in England by that time, and it was so much the custom to distinguish them merely by their christian names with the addition of their nationality, that it is very difficult to trace their family history. Rainbald the Fleming was a sub-tenant in Shipton at Domesday, and a Wido Flandrensis was among the benefactors to St. Peter's, Gloucester, in the first half of the next century, but his gift was Dowlais in Wales. The Alard the Fleming in question was so evidently a favourite captain of King John's, that I should have set him down as one of the leaders of the mercenary bands from Flanders, whom that monarch invited into his service in 1202 1 but that his name appears on the Pipe Roll of 2nd Richard I. as paying scutage for one fee in Gloucestershire, presumably these manors above mentioned. In 8th Richard I. he had a letter of quittance for his aid. In the Norman Roll of 4th John, the Chamberlain is ordered to pay Alard Fleming and Henry Rolleston the large sum of £1028 13s. 8d. for behoof of the Knights, Serjeants, and Cross bowmen engaged for wages at Castel Andel. In 6th John he is styled by the King in a mandate, " Marescallus Noster," 1 but what he was marshal of does not appear. At the date of this Return he appears to have been serving with his son in Ireland, for on the Prestita Roll of 12th John there is a payment of 20s. to " Alar- dus le Flemanc cum filio suo, milites de Exercitu Hibernie," and he is also elsewhere referred to as Abelardus le Fleming de Saperton. After the death of his master he took the Cross, for in the Fine Roll of 4th Henry III. the Sheriff is ordered to seize Saperton and Risendon, on account of the death of Alard le Fleming " in terra Jerusalem," and a little later on Henry, his son, has seizin of these manors on payment of £20.

 
 
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GENEALOGY of the LAMBERT-DICKINSON FAMILY
GENEALOGY of the LAMBERT-DICKINSON FAMILY
By Wharton Dickinson

Paragraph I.

Guy de Lambert was a soldier of fortune, born at Lambretch, in the wilds of Bohemia early in the tenth century, and served with distinction under Otho II, Emperor of Germany, who rewarded him with the Duchy of Bohemia, and the hand of his niece Agatha, daughter of Stephen the Saint, King of Hungary, in marriage. Guy adopted as his badge or crest "three ostrich feathers, gules, azure and gules," issuing out of a ducal coronet, and the motto "Ich Dien," I serve. This was borne by his descendants until the death of John the Blind, King of Bohemia, at the battle of Crecy, in France, in 1346; and Edward the Black Prince, son and heir of Edward III, assumed it and it has been borne by the Princes of Wales ever since. Guy left two sons:  
 

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