Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
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1
Adam De Carey
Adam De Carey
The first mention of the Cary Family was around 1086. They were listed in the “Domes Day Book”. They were living in Kari Castle. Over the years the spelling has changed several times. It has been spelled deKarry, Karry, Kari, Carye and Cary. The “De” in DeKarry most likely was French from the Norman invasion. It most likely was dropped for that reason after the invader considered themselves English and not Norman or French. There may have even been caused by one of the many conflicts or disagreements large and small between the two nations.  
 
2
Arms of Nassau, Counts of Eu
Arms of Nassau, Counts of Eu
 
 
3
Ascelin 'Gouel De Breval' D'Ivry
Ascelin "Gouel De Breval" D'Ivry
Ascelin Gouel De Perceval, Succeeded his father. This feudal lord, like his predecessor, held a distinguished place in the Norman army of the conquest, and for his services had a great of divers manors, particularly of Weston and Stawel, in the country of Somerset. He was a man of violent temper, and hence acquired the surname of LUPUS, or the Wolf. Odericus Vitalis gives the particulars of a long and extraordinary dispute which the Ascelin had with the Earl of Bretevil, in Normandy, and which terminated by his obtaining his own terms, after sustaining a siege of two months in his castle of Breherval, against a powerful army, commanded by the ablest captaine of the age- which terms included the retention of the fortress, and the hand of Isabella, the Earl of Bretevil's only daughter, in marriage.  
 
4
Bernard of Neufmarché
Bernard of Neufmarché
Bernard of Neufmarché (c.?1050 – c.?1125) was "the first of the original conquerors of Wales." He was a minor Norman lord who rose to power in the Welsh Marches before successfully undertaking the invasion and conquest of the Kingdom of Brycheiniog between 1088 and 1095. Out of the ruins of the Welsh kingdom he created the Anglo-Norman lordship of Brecon. His byname comes from Neuf-Marché, from the Latin Novo Mercato, and has sometimes been Anglicised as "Newmarket" or "Newmarch".  
 
5
Caleb Dickinson
Caleb Dickinson
Caleb Dickinson married Sarah Vickris, the daughter of one noted Quaker and granddaughter of another. Richard Vickris (d. 1700) was a religious writer. His grandfather, the first Richard Vickris to arrive in Bristol, was a native of Bewdley, Worcestershire. Having risen to wealth as a merchant of Bristol, he served as Sheriff of Bristol in 1636, Mayor of Bristol in 1646, and Master of the Merchant Venturers' Society in 1648. He did not forget his home parish. In 1637 he donated a green plush cushion to be used upon the pulpit in the Chapel of Bewdley. Then in 1661 he conveyed to trustees a farm-house and 10 acres at Oldbury, Gloucestershire, to pay £5 a year to the master of the grammar school in Bewdley, £3 to poor women in childbed, and the residue to the preacher serving Bewdley Chapel. This is convincing evidence that Richard Vickris (d.1668) remained within the Church of England. He asked to be buried in the burial ground of St Nicholas Church, Bristol, alongside his first wife, the mother of his son Robert. 
 
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Caleb Dickinson ans Sarah Vickris
Caleb Dickinson ans Sarah Vickris
When Caleb Dickinson died on 6 April 1783 he was buried in the parish church of Kingweston. He bequeathed his
estate to his only son, William, who had been born on 13 July 1745. William Dickinson did not follow his father's mercantile concerns, except those arising from his West Indian plantations, and his interest turned to politics. He was a student at Edinburgh and then at the age of 23 he became Member of Parliament for Great Marlow (Buckinghamshire) which he represented until he was defeated in 1774.  
 
7
Canon  Edmund Culpepper
Canon Edmund Culpepper
Edmund is named in his father's will (1559) as 'Edmonde Culpeper my Vij th (7th) son.' Foster records that he graduated B. A. Oxford, 1573 'from Hart Hall,' and subsequently proceeded M. A. (1578) and B. D. (1585). He was canon of Lincoln, 1581, and rector successively of Staplehurst, Kent (1585); of Ashbury (1587); of Sunningwell (1590); and of Milton, Berks (1591). 
 
8
Caroline Carey
Caroline Carey
Caroline Carey was the daughter of Major General Thomas Carey and his first wife Caroline Smith of Woodhall Park, Hertfordshire who died in 1816 following her daughter's birth. In 1835 the young Caroline married Francis Dickinson of Kingweston, a gentleman antiquarian in the high Anglican tradition who owned virtually the whole parish. They spent some of their time at Kingweston House by then surrounded by maturing plantations, avenues and parkland.  
 
9
Catherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham
Catherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham
Catherine Woodville (or Wydeville; c. 1458–18 May 1497) was an English medieval noblewoman, best known for her strategic marriages. She was the sister-in-law of King Edward IV of England and gave birth to several illustrious children. Catherine was the daughter of Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers, and Jacquetta of Luxembourg. When her sister Elizabeth married King Edward IV, the King elevated and promoted many members of the Woodville family. Elizabeth Woodville's household records for 1466/67 indicate that Catherine was being raised in the queen's household.  
 
10
Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham
Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham
On the accession of King Henry VIII, Buckingham began to play a more important part. He was appointed lord high constable on 23 June 1509, and lord high steward for the coronation on the following day, when he also bore the crown. On 20 Nov. following, he was sworn a Privy Councillor. In Henry's first parliament, which met on 21 Jan. 1509-10 and again in February 1511-2, Buckingham was a trier of petitions for England, Ireland, Wales, and Scotland. From June to October 1513 he was a captain in the English army in France, serving with five hundred men in the 'middle ward.' 
 
11
Eudes De Rye
Eudes De Rye
Baron Eudes ("Odo" in Norse) "FitzGeoffroi," Seigneur de Rie. He, with his father, Baron Geoffrey de Rie, gave half [the ownership of] the church of Rie to Fecamp Abbey, which was confirmed in 1027 by duke Richard ll. This information is from the Falaise Roll ("Neustria Pia," 218). These Norman noblemen were the Lords of the castle of Rye (aka Rie) near Bayeux in today's French departement of Calvados. 
 
12
Ezekiel Harmon
Ezekiel Harmon
Ezekiel Harman appears to have spent his early life at the family home established by his Grandfather Ezekiel Dickinson, at Bowden Park, Wiltshire, where he was a neighbour of William Henry Fox Talbot of Lacock Abbey. There are a large number of references to Ezekiel in the Fox Talbot correspondence collection and from these it would appear that he was very active in the community, being instrumental in having his friend, John McAdam, provide some of his men to assist in improving the local roads in 1833. He was also one of two guarantors of the £500 required to build the new workhouse at Lacock in 1833, and was involved in persuading Fox Talbot to make available 12 acres of arable farming land on the Lacock Abbey estate to enable the poor of the parish to raise their own food. 
 
13
Frances Vickriss Dickinson
Frances Vickriss Dickinson
The young heiress was brought up at Farley Hill and made her debut in London . She was lively, intelligent and well-educated. She could read French, Italian and German. Yet it was her wealth which made her a matrimonial prize. So an invitation from Colonel Andrew Geils 248 to Catherine Dickinson to visit his heavily-mortgaged estate at Dumbuck, Dunbartonshire should perhaps have been viewed by the widow with suspicion. Instead she took her daughter to Dumbuck in June 1838, where Frances met the Colonel's eldest son Lieutenant John Edward Geils, who was on sick leave from India. The 18-year- old Frances was swept off her feet and accepted the dashing Lieutenant in the teeth of protests by her mother.  
 
14
Francis Vickriss Dickinson
Francis Vickriss Dickinson
Frances Elliot was born Frances Vickriss Dickinson at Farley Hill Court in the Berkshire village of Swallowfield on 6 March 1820, the only child from Catherine Allingham's marriage to Charles Dickinson of Queen Charlton Manor,Somerset. She was an 18-year-old heiress when her life began to take its somewhat complicated path. On 8 October 1838, she married John Edward Geils from Glasgow in the Swallowfield church. The couple then departed for Scotland, but the marriage proved to be a disaster. After seven years, she left her husband and returned to Farley Hill Court, alleging his adultery with two of their maids, and violence towards her.  
 
15
Gale
Gale
The Gales were originally of Welsh descent: The Norman Conquest of England was in 1066, and within 200 years later the merging of Norman and British cultures may have been pretty well completed in general common life, where as the Welsh did not merge as the English did, and had much reason to still hate the merged Norman/English kingdom of England when King Edward I "Longshanks", in 1282 put an end to the royal dynasty of Wales in the defeat of their beloved king Llywelyn II.  
 
16
Gen Thomas Carey
Gen Thomas Carey
 
 
17
Gen Thomas Carey 2
Gen Thomas Carey 2
 
 
18
Geoffrey De Rye
Geoffrey De Rye
Baron Geoffroi (Geoffrey), Lord of Rie, was born circa 0943 at Ryes (aka Rie), a village near Bayeux, Lower Normandy, France. His exact parentage is unknown but he was a Norman nobleman and Seigneur (Lord) of this section of Lower Normandy, under the Dukes of Normandy, vassals to the the King of France. This is what was said by a contemporary monk, writing around 1040 AD. 
 
19
Geoffrey De Say Coat of Arms
Geoffrey De Say Coat of Arms
Geoffrey de Say sat in the baronial camp in an uneasy alliance with Geoffrey de Mandeville, his cousin but also his rival for the inheritance of the de Mandeville earls of Essex. The competition between the two men and their families affords a reminder that there were divisions within the baronial camp as well as between the rebel barons and the king. No more than any other medieval opposition such as the Appellants in Richard II’s were the Twenty Five of John’s reign a solid monolithic bloc unhindered by faction or rivalry. 
 
20
George Bishop
George Bishop
George Bishop is an extremely important figure in the original Quaker movement, and along with Richard Vickris, is mentioned in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. He was born in 1615 in Bristol and became a Captain in Oliver Cromwell’s army during the Civil War, supporting the execution of Charles I.  
 
21
Gilbert De Maminot
Gilbert De Maminot
William the Conqueror granted the Manor of Deptford or West Greenwich to Gilbert Magminot or Maminot, bishop of Lisieux, one of the eight barons associated with John de Fiennes for the defence of Dover Castle. These eight barons had to provide between them 112 soldiers, 25 of whom were always to be on duty within the castle, and the rest to be ready for any emergency. Gilbert de Maminot’s share of the lands amounted to 24 knight’s fees as follows: two in Pevington, two in Eastwell, two in Davington, one in Cocklescombe, three in Thornden, three in Waldershare, two in Kennington, two in Cowdham, one in Billingham, one in Hartwell, one of Hugh Cheriton, one of Ralph Rovery, two of Roger Barham and one of Simon Wellard, which together made up the barony of Maminot, held at Deptford as the head of the barony. 
 
22
Henry Lovel and Alice De Carey
Henry Lovel and Alice De Carey
In 1184 Henry Lovel appears to have got him self into duel within the Kings court to stttle a dispute with Gerard of Broton. The dispute was over ownership of Brocton (Bratton Seymour) and Henry Lovel lost. The land was forfeited and he also was fined. This fine remained unpaid until 1204 when it had amounted to the sum of £86 and 3 shillings, an enormous amount at that time.

Henry Lovel, son of Ralph II, was tenant in chief at Castle Cary in 1166, married a certain Alice de Cary who may have been a co-heiress of the Bramptons. According to Sir William Pole, an Adam was a lord at Castle Kari in 1198, forty years after the destruction of the castle fortifications . It may be that Adam de Cary held a portion of Castle Cary as sub-tenant of Ralph Lovel, son of Henry. 
 
23
Hubert De Rye
Hubert De Rye
Hubert de Rie, a trusty servant to William Duke of Normandy, being by him sent on a mission to that king when he lay on his death-bed, came with a pompous equipage *["Cum pompa magna, equis phaleratis of frematu terribilibus, hominibus serico indutis et colore vestrum spectabilis." Such an embassy would scarcely have escaped the notice of the Saxon chroniclers] into England, and after conference with King Edward, returned to the Duke with certain tokens by which he was declared by that King his heir to the crown of this realm, viz, a sword, in the belt whereof were enclosed the relics of some saints, a hunter's horn of gold and the head of a mighty stag, for which service the Duke promised Hubert he should be steward of his household. 
 
24
Jane Bicknell 'A sober religious woman'
Jane Bicknell "A sober religious woman"
1658 release of premises at Fryern Street, Bridgwater (adjoining premises described), Aldred Bickham and Mary his wife, daughter and executrix of the will of Hugh Bickham, late of Bridgwater, Somerset, deceased to Jane Bicknell, daughter of Amias Bicknell of Gregory Stoke, Somerset, spinster; 1660 lease of premises at Fryern Street, Bridgwater (adjoining premises described), Jane Bicknell, daughter of Amos Bicknell of Gregory Stoke, Somerset, spinster to Ames Bicknell, yeoman. 
 
25
John 'Jacky' Fuller
John "Jacky" Fuller
John [Jacky] Fuller (1706-1755), ironmaster and gun-founder, was the eldest of the ten children of John [iii] Fuller and his wife, Elizabeth. He was born on 1 February 1706. In 1723 he went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, and in 1724 was admitted to the Middle Temple. He was elected FRS in 1726. On the death of his father in 1745 he took over the estate and its ironworks in a period of great demand for ordnance.  
 
26
John 'Mad Jack' Fuller
John "Mad Jack" Fuller
Fuller was born on February 20, 1757 in North Stoneham, Hampshire. Hewas christened in the village of Waldron, near Heathfield in Sussex (now East Sussex).. His parents were the Reverend Henry Fuller (January 15, 1713 - July 23, 1761) and his wife Frances, n?e Fuller(1725 - February 14, 1778). Fuller had two sisters: Elizabeth who married Sir John Palmer Acland and Frances who married Lancelot Brown, son of famed landscape gardener Capability Brown.

He lost his father in 1761, when he was four years old. At the age often, in 1767, he began his education at Eton.

On May 7, 1777, Jack Fuller?s uncle Rose Fuller died leaving Jack his Sussex estates and Jamaican plantations. Jack Fuller thus took possession of the Rose Hill estate (now Brightling Park) at Brightling at the age of 20. 
 
27
John Anderton
John Anderton
In the Sixth-month this year [August 1680], came down the Duke of Monmouth, in his Progress in the West, and came through Ivelchester with some thousands on horseback attending him ; the country flocking to him and after him, the eyes of the nation being upon him and towards him as the hopes and head of the Protestant interest at that time in opposition to the Duke of York and Popish party ; so that the affections of the people run exceedingly after him. We stood in the Friary-gate as he rode through the town ; and as he passed by, taking notice of so many Quakers together with their hats on, he stopped and put off his hat to us; and our Friend, John Anderdon, had a mind to speak to him and tell him that we were prisoners for conscience' sake ; but had a stop in his mind, lest there should be an ill use made of it, in applying to him and making him too popular — the Court having a watchful eye over him. However, we could not but have a respect to him for his affability ; and therefore were the more concerned for him when his fall came. 
 
28
John Cotton MP
John Cotton MP
Coming from a family with a tradition of public service in the borough, Cotton was elected mayor in 1376. Acting in this capacity on behalf of the town, he made a fine of £2 at the Exchequer for the restoration of its liberties, and he also purchased a vacant lot on the bank of the river Cam, which he then leased out for the town at 4d.a year.3 At the beginning of his second mayoral term he stood surety for John Sibille when the latter was elected as knight of the shire to the Parliament of October 1377.  
 
29
John De Coton
John De Coton
John is the earliest member of the Cotton family to be positively identified. He is referred to as John de Coton and originated in the small parish of Coton a few miles west of the city of Cambridge. Coton or Cotton means "cote-town", or, a village of cottages or small huts. The above decent from Henry Cotton and Anne Fleming was given in the 1619 Visitation of Cambridgeshire, however, it may be suspect as these generations cannot be supported from primary sources as being connected with John de Coton.

John was appointed Mayor of Cambridge in 1378 and was also a Burgess in several parliaments for Cambridge during the reign of Richard II. 
 
30
John Dickinson and Ann Adams 1
John Dickinson and Ann Adams 1
 
 
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John Dickinson and Ann Adams 2
John Dickinson and Ann Adams 2
 
 
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John Dickinson and Ann Adams 2
John Dickinson and Ann Adams 2
 
 
33
John Fuller
John Fuller
John [iii] Fuller (bap. 1680, d. 1745), ironmaster and gun-founder, was the eldest son of John [ii] Fuller, of Tanners, Waldron, Sussex, and his wife, Elizabeth, the daughter of Samuel Fowle of London. He was baptized at Waldron on 28 July 1680. On 20 July 1703 he married Elizabeth (bap. 1681, d. 1728), daughter of Fulke Rose, of Jamaica, and his wife, Elizabeth, who later married Hans Sloane. The marriage settlement brought a large fortune from sugar plantations in St Katherine's and St John's parishes in Jamaica, the income from which formed an increasingly significant element in the family's wealth. In 1705 he took possession of Brightling Park, which he renamed Rose Hill, in honour of his wife. During the ensuing years a substantial amount of property in the Brightling and Burwash areas was purchased.  
 
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Journal of the Butler Society 2
Journal of the Butler Society 2
 
 
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Journal of the Butler Society 3
Journal of the Butler Society 3
 
 
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Journal of the Butler Society 4
Journal of the Butler Society 4
 
 
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Journal of the Butler Society 5
Journal of the Butler Society 5
 
 
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Journal of the Butler Society 6
Journal of the Butler Society 6
 
 
39
Journal of the Butler Society 7
Journal of the Butler Society 7
 
 
40
Journal of the Butler Society I
Journal of the Butler Society I
 
 
41
Langdale
Langdale
LANGTHORPE manor, of 1 carucate, belonged in 1066 to Thor and, possibly in succession to him, to Egfrid. It passed to William Malet and, after his deprivation c. 1070, to Drew de Bevrère, the tenant in 1086. It was later part of the Aumale fee. In the mid 13th century the St. Quintins were the tenants at Langthorpe.

Swine priory had land at Langthorpe by the 1240s, and its grange there was recorded from 1294. After the Dissolution, Langthorpe grange was granted to Sir Richard Gresham and then returned to the Crown, which sold it to Thomas Reeve and George Cotton in 1553; it then comprised two farms, each with 3 bovates. All or much of Langthorpe passed to Marmaduke Langdale (d. 1611) 
 
42
Lord Robert de Rumilly
Lord Robert de Rumilly
Cecily married William de Meschines about 1097 while living in England. William was born about 1100, lived in Gernon Castle, Normandy. He was the son of Earl Of Chester Ranulph "De Briquessart" de Meschin and Countess Lucy de Rumily. He died about 1125 while living in Normandy, France . 
 
43
Lt Col Hugh Carey Dickinson
Lt Col Hugh Carey Dickinson
After 3 years on home service he set sail for British East Africa, being seconded from his regiment to the Kings African Rifles. After home leave in 1913-14 he returned to duty when the great War broke out. Taking part in active operations in German East Africa, in 1917 raising an extra battalion of the Kings African Rifles with the rank of Lt Colonel. He was wounded in the neck by a spiked bullet in July 1917, taking two months to recover from the severe injuries sustained.  
 
44
Major John Fenwick
Major John Fenwick
John Fenwick, the proprietor of the one-tenth of West New Jersey, was born in Northumberland county, at Stanton Manor, in England, in the year 1618. He was the second son of Wm. Fenwick, and in the year 1640 he became a member of the church of England. In the year 1645 he was a student of law at Grey's Inn, in London. Soon after he was made captain of Cavalry by Cromwell; he taking such active part against the crown, it has been the opinion of many, that it was the primary cause, after Charles II ascended the throne, that there was so little favor shown him in the affairs of the colony. About the year 1648 he married Elizabeth Covert, of the county of Sapoy. The Coverts as well as the Fenwicks were ancient families, and they can be traced back in English history as early as the 12th century. He had three children by Elizabeth Covert, all daughters; Elizabeth, Anne and Priscilla Fenwick. His second wife was Mary Burdet, the daughter of Sir Walter Burdet, and there was no children by that connection. In 1665 he and his wife Elizabeth became members of the society of Friends. He, like many others of that religious faith and other descendants, were imprisoned for conscience sake. About that time Lord Berkley offered West New Jersey for sale. There appeardd to have been an understanding between Edward Billinger and John Fenwick, for John Fenwick to purchase the whole of West New Jersey, and Fenwick to have the one-tenth of the whole.  
 
45
Monk House, Wiltshire
Monk House, Wiltshire
Barnard Dickinson at Monks House, concerning Jamaican business, 17 Jul 1794-14 Dec 1794. Includes reference to the recommendation to sell sugar in Jamaica, rather than ship it to Britain and the purchase of slaves for Appleton Plantation, 23 Nov 1794; building work at Monks House, 17 Jul 1794; his confidence in Dr White as Overseers for their Jamaican properties and a request from some cranberry bushes, 27 Jul 1794; the poor condition of the Jamaican properties and proposed repairs, 19 Aug 1794; the sending of a horse and groom to [Jamaica] and the recruitment of a carpenter, 14 Dec 1794; the sending of Jamaica accounts, 7 Dec 1794. 
 
46
Monks House 2
Monks House 2
 
 
47
Pordage
Pordage
For Pordage of Rodmershain (near Sittingbourne and only a few miles north of Greenway Court) see Hasted, ii, 593; The Genealogist, vi, 76. For Stede of Harrietsham, with whom the Wigsell Culpepers several times intermarried in consequence of this alliance of Francis11, see the pedigree returned at the Visitation of Kent, 1619 (Harl. Soc. Pub., xlii, 71) and Berry's continuation in his Kent. One of these Stedes, whose mother was a Culpeper, served in America as Governor of Barbados. 
 
48
Ranulph 'the Crusader' De Glanville
Ranulph "the Crusader" De Glanville
In 1176 we find Glanville a justice itinerant, and in 1180 he became Chief Justiciar of England. He had now reached the zenith of royal favour, which position he kept throughout the remainder of Henry's reign, being on occasion employed on various embassies, negotiations, and warlike expeditions, and in 1182 was appointed an executor of the king's will. In 1189 Henry II died. At the coronation of his successor, Richard I, the same year, Chief Justiciar Glanville was present, and when that prince took the cross, Glanville joined him, contributing a large sum towards the crusade. In the autumn of 1190 he died at the siege of Acre, a victim to the unwholesomeness of the climate. By his wife, Bertha, a daughter of a neighbouring Suffolk landowner, Theobald de Valognes, he left three daughters. Glanville is the reputed author of a celebrated work entitled "Tractatus de Legibus et de Consuetudinibus Regni Angliae", the oldest known treatise on English jurisprudence, more likely written by his illustrious nephew and secretary, Hubert Walter. Furthermore, he founded two abbeys, both in Suffolk, viz., Butley, for Black Canons, in 1171, and Leiston, for White Canons, in 1183; also a leper hospital at Somerton, in Norfolk. 
 
49
Rev William Dickinson
Rev William Dickinson
He went on to supply his pedigree. A family tree of the Dickinsons, drawn from such family sources, was published in 1836. It starts with William Dickinson, Rector of Appleton (then in Berkshire and now in Oxfordshire.) William was educated at Oxford University, gaining his B.D. In 1619. He was instituted Rector of Besselsleigh and of Appleton in 1620. The young rector married Mary Culpepper in 1622. His elder and youngest sons were christened in Appleton.  
 
50
Richard Marchant and Mary Evett
Richard Marchant and Mary Evett
Like many other early Quakers, he was persecuted for practising and writing about his beliefs, and was detained and fined repeatedly. Then in 1684, Richard Vickris was made an example of, and was tried and convicted for refusing either to renounce his beliefs or leave the country. He was sentenced to death on 23 August 1684, the only Quaker threatened with the death penalty for the refusal to conform. With the support of William Penn, Richard’s wife Elizabeth Bishop Vickris travelled to London where she met with the King’s brother, James Duke of York. With the Duke’s intervention the sentence was quashed and Richard was freed. 
 

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