Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
Discovering our American, Australian, British, Canadian and European Ancestors
First Name: 
Last Name: 

Coat of Arms


Matches 1 to 14 of 14     » Thumbnails Only    » Slide Show

   

 #   Thumb   Description   Linked to 
1
De Grandmesnil Coat of Arms
De Grandmesnil Coat of Arms
The arms of Grandmesnil are described as “gules, a pale or” which means “a red shield with a broad, vertical gold line in the middle.” 
 
2
De Montfort Coat of Arms
De Montfort Coat of Arms
 
 
3
Dover Castle
Dover Castle
The latter was a companion of the Conqueror and furnished fifty ships and sixty knights for the expedition. He is referred to by Orderic Vital in this connection as "earl Hugh the constable" and William of Poitiers and Benoit de St-More also affirm his presence at Senlac. Hugh came into prominence at the battle of Mortimer in 1054, in which engagement he was one of the leaders. The Conqueror for his part in the conquest of England rewarded him with 113 manors in Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk and Kent, with a large portion of Romney marsh, and he was one of the noblemen whom the Conqueror entrusted with the government of England when that monarch visited Normandy in 1067.  
 
4
Edmund Dickinson Coat of Arms
Edmund Dickinson Coat of Arms
Dr. Dickinson received for himself, and brother, the following grant of arms:

viz. gules, between two lions

"Or, a bend, engrailed, rampant, gules."

Crest: Out of clouds ppr. a cubit arm, erect ppr. holding a branch of laurel, vert."  
 
5
Gilbert De Gand
Gilbert De Gand
Few among the Conqueror's companions of arms were so splendidly rewarded as Gilbert de Gand, who held one hundred and seventy-two English manors.; yet there is much doubt? or at least much difference of opinion? as to who he really was. Dugdale, and after him Sir Henry Ellis and others, have called him a younger son of Baldwin, Earl of Flanders, and consequently the nephew of Queen Matilda; but this opinion appears to be now altogether exploded. Mr. Freeman discards it as "an amazing piece of genealogy," and promptly dubs him "a Flemish adventurer," without stooping to explain how or why it was that a mere soldier of fortune received so vast a grant of territory.  
 
6
Gilbert Talbot Coat of Arms
Gilbert Talbot Coat of Arms
GILBERT TALBOT, son and heir, obtained a new charter of Linton from Richard I, dated at Gisors, 30 March 1190; and in 1190-91 began to account for 200 marks to have the manor thereof, being allowed in his account certain sums for work on the bailey of Skinfrith, co. Monmouth, and for payments to knights and foot and horse soldiers. He appears in the scutages of King John as holding one knight's fee, being elsewhere described as a knight in February 1207/8; and in 1219 and 1221 was in commissions for Herefordshire. The name of his wife is not known. He died before 13 February 1230/1.  
 
7
Howard Coat of Arms
Howard Coat of Arms
 
 
8
Ivo De Grandmesnil
Ivo De Grandmesnil
"The town of Leicester had four masters -- the King, the Bishop of Lincoln, Earl Simon" (Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon), "and Ivo, the son of Hugh" (de Grentmesnil). The latter had been heavily fined for turbulent conduct, and was in disgrace at Court. He was also galled by being nicknamed "the Rope-dancer," having been one of those who had been let down by ropes from the walls of Antioch.  
 
9
Rhys ap Gruffydd
Rhys ap Gruffydd
 
 
10
Richard Talbot Coat of Arms
Richard Talbot Coat of Arms
 
 
11
Richard Talbot Coat of Arms
Richard Talbot Coat of Arms
RICHARD TALBOT was granted by Henry II the manor of Linton. At Michaelmas 1156 he is recorded as holding out of lands granted from Ancient Demesne, farmed by the sheriff of Herefordshire, 33 l. bl. in Linton and Wilton with Hugh de Longchamp. The name of his wife is unknown . He was living in 1174 and died before Michaelmas 1175.  
 
12
Stourton Coat of Arms
Stourton Coat of Arms
The name Stoughton is derived from the Anglo-Saxon word "stoctun" which means a large fenced dwelling. This family adopted the name because they owned the manor of Stoughton in Surrey. The original form of the name was "de Stoctun, " and it was also spelled Stochton, Staughton, Stogton, Stawton, Stocketon, Stocktun and Stotun, before being standardized at the present spelling about the reign of Henry VIII.
 
 
13
Talbot Coat of Arms
Talbot Coat of Arms
 
 
14
Talbot Coat of Arms
Talbot Coat of Arms