Dickinson/Milson Genealogy
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Whether your name be Dickinson, Dickenson, Dickerson or Dickonson, I bring you greetings to-day from our common ancestors, among whose blessed shades I have been wandering for the past few months. 
 
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Lady Joan de Beaufort was born circa 1375 at Chateau de Beaufort, Montmorency-Beaufort, Champagne, France. She was the daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Katherine Roet. Her birth was legitimized by Parliament 29 Sep 1397, after the marriage of her parents. 
 
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Baldwin Wake, Lord of Bourne was born between 1238 and 1258. He married, secondly, Hawise de Quincy, daughter of Robert de Quincy, Lord of Ware and Helen ap Llywelyn, circa 1268. He died between 4 February 1281 and 1282. 
 
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Henry IV (15 April 1367– 20 March 1413), also known as Henry Bolingbroke, was King of England and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413, and asserted the claim of his grandfather, Edward III, to the Kingdom of France.

Henry was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire. His father, John of Gaunt, was the fourth son of Edward III and the third son to survive to adulthood, and enjoyed a position of considerable influence during much of the reign of Henry's cousin Richard II, whom Henry eventually deposed.

Henry's mother was Blanche, heiress to the considerable Lancaster estates, and thus he became the first King of England from the Lancaster branch of the Plantagenets and the first King of England since the Norman Conquest whose mother tongue was English rather than French. 
 
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Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor.

Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey. During Mary's reign, Elizabeth was imprisoned for nearly a year on suspicion of supporting Protestant rebels. 
 
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JOHN TALBOT, 1ST EARL OF SHREWSBURY, a famous commander, was born at Blechmore, in Shropshire. He was the second son of Sir Richard Talbot of Goodrich castle, in Herefordshire; and on the death of his elder brother, Sir Gilbert, he became heir to that family.

He was called to parliament by Henry IV by the title of Lord Furnival, whose eldest daughter and co-heiress he had married, and was appointed lord-justice of Ireland in 1412, and lord-lieutenant in 1414, in which post he continued seven years, during which he performed great services to the crown, taking prisoner Donald Mac Murrough, a dangerous insurgent. In 1420 he attended on Henry V to France, and was present with him at two sieges, and in his triumphant entry into Paris. Being retained to serve the king in his French wars [cf. Hundred Years' War] with a body of men at arms and archers, he assisted at the siege of Meaux, and remained in France till the death of Henry. 
 
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Effigy of John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, KG (d.1453), Whitchurch, Shropshire. A talbot dog is shown as the crest (head missing) on his helmet on which his head rests and also as his footrest.

John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and 1st Earl of Waterford KG (1384/1387 in Blakemere, Shropshire – 17 July 1453 in Castillon, France), known as "Old Talbot" was a noted English military commander during the Hundred Years' War, as well as the only Lancastrian Constable of France.

He was descended from Richard Talbot, a tenant in 1086 of Walter Giffard at Woburn and Battledsen in Bedfordshire. The Talbot family were vassals of the Giffards in Normandy.  
 
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Talbot was already a knight when, on 26 July 1444, he was created Lord and Baron Lisle of Kingston Lisle in Berkshire by Henry VI,[1] his mother being one of the co-heirs to the previous creation of the barony. He stood to inherit much of her estates in Wales on the Welsh Marches, and in Gloucestershire at Painswick. She had fought long and hard to enfranchise her son for the duration of the Berkeley feud, in which the young nobleman's manor house was raided by Lord Berkeley's brothers. After 1449, his mother was one of three co-heiresses to her father, and through her he possessed a claim on Berkeley Castle. In 1451, already a veteran of the fight at St Barnets Green,[clarification needed] he was created Viscount Lisle.  
 
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James of Aldithley was also known as James d'Audley. He held the office of Keeper of the Castle of Newcastle-under-Lyme on 30 October 1250. He held the office of Sheriff of Staffordshire from 1261 to 1262.1 He held the office of Sheriff of Shropshire from 1261 to 1262.1 He fought in the campaign in the Welsh Marches in 1264, for the king, against the Barons.1 He fought in the Evesham campaign in 1265. He held the office of Justiciar [Ireland] between 1270 and 1272. He held the office of Sheriff of Staffordshire from 1270 to 1271. He held the office of Sheriff of Shropshire from 1270 to 1271. He lived at Heleigh, Staffordshire, England.

James de Aldithley, Justiciar of Ireland was first or second son of Henry of Aldithley and Berta Mainwaring. He was a witness where Nicholas, 1st Lord Audley second son and eventual representative of Nicholas de Aldithely, who was son of James de Aldithley, one of the Lords-Marcher, and an active adherent of Henry III in his contests with the Barons,  
 
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He and twenty-six others were knighted by Edward III in July 1355[3] while English forces were at the Downs before sailing to France. In 1356 he served in a campaign in Brittany. He had livery of his lands on 14 November 1361; however his inheritance was subject to the dower which his father had settled on his stepmother, Elizabeth de Vere. By 1369 she had married Sir William de Cossington, son and heir of Stephen de Cossington of Cossington in Aylesford, Kent; not long after the marriage she and her new husband surrendered themselves to the Fleet prison for debt. According to Archer, the cause may have been Mowbray's prosecution of his stepmother for waste of his estates; he had been awarded damages against her of almost £1000. 
 
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Danby bears for Arms:—Argent, three Chevronels interlaced in bate, sable; on a chief of the second, three Mullets, of the first.

Crest:—A crab proper.

Sir Christopher Danby, her husband, was son of Sir James, and grandson of Sir Robert Danby, of Thorpe Perrow, Knt., Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench, who died 11 Edw. IV. (1472), and who was one of the younger sons of Thomas Danby, of Danby. super-wiske, by Mary, daughter of Sir Robert Tanfield, Knt. This Thomas Danby, was the ninth in lineal descent, from Roger Stringent, otherwise Danby, Lord of Danby-super-wiske, in the time of the Conqueror. The first of the family mentioned in the Pedigree, is Edward Stringent, a soldier of fortune, who came over with William, who gave him for wife Armatrude, daughter of John, Lord of Great, and Little Danby. 
 
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 De Mortimer, Coat of Arms
De Mortimer, Coat of Arms
Edmund was knighted by King Edward at Winchester, and served in the king's Gascon and Scottish campaigns. He was mortally wounded in a skirmish near Builth, and died at Wigmore Castle. 
 
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 of Edmund Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster, and his successors.
of Edmund Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster, and his successors.
 
 
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'Castle mound' Eye, Suffolk
"Castle mound" Eye, Suffolk
 
 
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'Women of the English nobility and gentry, 1066-1500' By Jennifer C. Ward
"Women of the English nobility and gentry, 1066-1500" By Jennifer C. Ward
"After the death of William Peverel (c.113-1133), the whole barony of Pain Peverel was divided among four sisters. The eldest was called Matilda de Dover (d. 1185), and she died without an heir of her body. And so the inheritance devolved on three sisters and Matilda's share was divided among them. One was the wife of Hamo Pecche senior (d.1178-1185) and was called Alice. She had sons and daughters.  
 
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17th century representation of Lambert I and Gerberga
17th century representation of Lambert I and Gerberga
Counts of Leuven

In 959 the East Frankish king Otto I of Germany elevated Count Godfrey of Jülich to the rank of duke of Lower Lorraine. In 962 the duchy became an integral part of the Holy Roman Empire, where Godfrey's successors of the ducal Ardennes-Verdun dynasty also ruled over the Gau of Brabant. Here the Counts of Leuven rose to power, when about 1000 Count Lambert I the Bearded married Gerberga, the daughter of Duke Charles of Lower Lorraine, and acquired the County of Brussels. About 1024 southernmost Brabant fell to Count Reginar V of Mons (Bergen, later Hainaut), and Imperial lands up to the Schelde river in the west came under the rule of the French Counts Baldwin V of Flanders by 1059. Upon the death of Count Palatine Herman II of Lotharingia in 1085, Emperor Henry IV assigned his fief between the Dender and Zenne rivers as the Landgraviate of Brabant to Count Henry III of Leuven and Brussels. 
 
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19th-century statue of Sir William De La Pole
19th-century statue of Sir William De La Pole
There is an avenue (de la Pole avenue) located in the west of Kingston upon Hull named after Sir William. 
 
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Account of the Parish of Church Eaton in the County of Stafford.
Account of the Parish of Church Eaton in the County of Stafford.
The manor of Eaton at the time of the Conquest included the present townships of Church Eaton, Wood Eaton, and Orslow. It was held in 1085–6 by Godric, of the Baron of Stafford. It is called Eitone in the Domesday Record, and is to be distinguished from the neighbouring manor of Water Eaton (there called Etone) in the parish of Penkridge, and in the same fief and hundred, by the mention of a resident Priest. The Priest implies the existence of that Parish Church which gives its distinctive name to Church Eaton. The record runs as follows:—

"Robert de Stafford holds in Eitone iij. hides, and Godric of him 
 
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Adam De Carey
Adam De Carey
The first mention of the Cary Family was around 1086. They were listed in the “Domes Day Book”. They were living in Kari Castle. Over the years the spelling has changed several times. It has been spelled deKarry, Karry, Kari, Carye and Cary. The “De” in DeKarry most likely was French from the Norman invasion. It most likely was dropped for that reason after the invader considered themselves English and not Norman or French. There may have even been caused by one of the many conflicts or disagreements large and small between the two nations.  
 
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Adam De Swillington
Adam De Swillington
Of this family, which assumed its surname from a lordship in the west riding of Yorkshire. Adam De Swillington, who, in the times of Edward I. and Edward II. was in the Scottish wars, and in the latter reign obtained charter for free warren, in all his desme lands at Swillington, Thorpe-Pyron, and Thorpe o the Hill, in the county of York 
 
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Adam De Swillington
Adam De Swillington
 
 
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Adam De Swillington - Wades Mill Thundridge
Adam De Swillington - Wades Mill Thundridge
Thundridge

Before the Conquest the manor of THUNDRIDGE, sometimes called WADESMILL, was held by Alnod under Stigand, Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1086 it formed part of the possessions of Odo Bishop of Bayeux, of whom it was held by Hugh de Grentmesnil. It was assessed at 1 hide only. There was land for four ploughs, but there were only three on the manor, one of which was on the demesne; there was meadow for four plough-teams, woodland for sixteen swine, and a mill (fn. 9) (possibly on the site of Wadesmill). After the forfeiture of the Bishop of Bayeux the manor was held of the king in chief by the successors of Grentmesnil, and this tenancy follows the descent of the manor of Ware (q.v.). 
 
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Adela of Normandy
Adela of Normandy
Adela of Normandy, of Blois, or of England (c. 1067[1] – 8 March 1137), also known as Saint Adela in Roman Catholicism, was, by marriage, Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux. She was a daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders. She was also the mother of Stephen, King of England and Henry of Blois, Bishop of Winchester. 
 
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Adelaide of Burgandy
Adelaide of Burgandy
 
 
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Adeliza De Toeni
Adeliza De Toeni
 
 
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AEthelred the Unready
AEthelred the Unready
 
 
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AEthelred with her nephew Athelstan
AEthelred with her nephew Athelstan
Tamworth Castle, Staffordshire 
 
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Agnes De Beaumont
Agnes De Beaumont
After the death of her brothers she inherited from her paternal grandfather Richard I of Beaumont, and was viscountess of Beaumont. She married, prior to the death of Richard, Louis of Acre, third son of John of Brienne, King of Jerusalem, and Berenguela of Leon.

 
 
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Aimeri IV 'the Poictivin' De Thouars
Aimeri IV "the Poictivin" De Thouars
In 1055 he was allied with Geoffroy Martel, Count of Anjou, against William, Duke of Normandy, and he participated in the siege of Ambrières, a castle built by William on the border of the County of Maine. After returning to Thouars in 1056, he joined the army of the Duke of Aquitaine to fight against the Saracens in Spain. He participated in the capture of Barbastro and brought a rich booty back to his hometown of Thouars.

In 1066, he was in England as part of the invading army of William the Conqueror. At the Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066, he commanded a corps composed of Poitevins, Bretons, and Angevins. Aimery IV did not settle in England, however, but received ample reimbursement and returned to France. 
 
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Alfred Dickinson
Alfred Dickinson
 
 
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Alfred George Milson
Alfred George Milson
 
 
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Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
 
 
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Alice Chaucer
Alice Chaucer
Thomas married secondly before 1424, Alice Chaucer, granddaughter of the noted author Geoffrey Chaucer, but their marriage was childless. He was mortally wounded on 27 October 1428 at the Siege of Orléans and died several days later on 3 November. 
 
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Alienor_Pembroke.jpg
Alienor_Pembroke.jpg
At the time of Eleanor's birth at Gloucester, King John's London was in the hands of French forces, John had been forced to sign the Magna Carta and Queen Isabella was in shame. Eleanor never met her father, as he died at Newark Castle when she was barely a year old. The French, led by Prince Louis the Lion, the future Louis VIII, were marching through the south. The only lands loyal to her brother, Henry III of England, were in the Midlands and southwest. The barons ruled the north, but they united with the royalists under William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who protected the young king Henry, and Louis was defeated. 
 
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An 18th century illustration of Henry Stafford
An 18th century illustration of Henry Stafford
Henry Stafford, Second Duke of Buckingham (1454-1483), was the son of Humphrey Stafford, killed at the first battle of St. Albans in 1455, and grandson of Humphrey the 1st Duke (cr. 1444), killed at Northampton in 1460, both fighting for Lancaster. The first duke, who bore the title of Earl of Buckingham in right of his mother, was the son of Edmund, 5th Earl of Stafford, and of Anne, daughter of Thomas, Duke of Gloucester, youngest son of Edward III; Henry's mother was Margaret Beaufort, daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset,* grandson of John of Gaunt. Thus he came on both sides of the Blood Royal, and this, coupled with the vastness of his inheritance, made the young duke's future of importance to Edward IV. 
 
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Ann Danby
Ann Danby
Lady Calverley (b.1534), aged 37 
 
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Ann Keenan Walsh with children
Ann Keenan Walsh with children
 
 
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Ann Morgan-Lady Hunsdon
Ann Morgan-Lady Hunsdon
Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Morgan of Arkestone in Herefordshire and in 1559 he was created Baron Hunsdon of Hunsdon (in Hertfordshire). They had 10 children. The youngest was Robert who was created Baron Carey of Leppington and then 1st Earl of Monmouth in 1626. Henry died at Somerset House in London and the Queen paid for his funeral at the Abbey. Anne did not actually die until 19th January 1607. 
 
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Anne Boleyn
Anne Boleyn
'She is of middling stature, with a swarthy complexion, long neck, wide mouth, bosom not much raised, and in fact has nothing but the King's great appetite, and her eyes, which are black and beautiful - and take great effect on those who served the Queen when she was on the throne. She lives like a queen, and the King accompanies her to Mass - and everywhere.' the Venetian ambassador describes Anne, 1532 
 
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Anne Neville
Anne Neville
As a member of the powerful House of Neville, she played a critical part in the Wars of the Roses fought between the House of York and House of Lancaster for the English crown. Her father Warwick betrothed her as a girl to Edward, Prince of Wales, the son of Henry VI. The marriage was to seal an alliance to the House of Lancaster and halt the civil war between the two houses of Lancaster and York. 
 
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Anne Stafford, Baroness Latimer
Anne Stafford, Baroness Latimer
 
 
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Annie Maria Lyons
Annie Maria Lyons
Annie was accidently kicked by horse, Buried: Muswellbrook, NSW On the copy of her Death Certificate it states she spent 1 year in Tasmania and 28 years in NSW. 
 

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